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The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Expired
Overall Score Expired
Liaison Corey Hawkey
Submission Date July 29, 2011
Executive Letter Download

STARS v1.0

Arizona State University
PAE-10: Affordability and Access Programs

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete Expired Betty Lombardo
Manager
University Sustainability Practices
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have policies and programs in place to make it accessible and affordable to low-income students?:
Yes

A brief description of the institution’s participation in federal TRIO programs:

Introduction: TRIO is a set of federally-funded college opportunity programs that motivate and support students from low-income and/or first-generation college backgrounds. TRIO also provides motivation and support for students with disabilities and U.S. veterans.

Upward Bound, Tempe Campus
Number Served 112 annually

Brief Description
The ultimate purpose of the Upward Bound Program (UBP) is to prepare participants to succeed in a program of postsecondary education. The project is designed to increase the academic skills and motivational levels of project participants to the extent they will complete high school and successfully enter postsecondary educational programs and graduate.

Veterans Upward Bound, Tempe Campus
Number Served 120 annually

Brief Description
The mission of Veterans Upward Bound (VUB) is to provide free academic instruction and career guidance that will enhance the veteran’s ability to succeed in their educational goals beyond high school. VUB is an educational program designed to meet the needs of the veterans who seek to improve their academic skills in English, reading, math and computer literacy. In addition to free academic instruction, VUB assists with financial aid and scholarship applications, directs veterans to Veterans Administration services, and helps them connect with the educational institution of their choice.

TRIO Disability Student Support Services (Student Success in Academia and Beyond for Students with Disabilities), Tempe Campus
Number Served 270 annually

Brief Description
The mission of the TRIO Disability Student Support Services (DSSS) is to increase the retention and graduation rates of participants. TRIO DSSS is designed to provide enhancement services for students with disabilities. These services include academic enhancement workshops, instructional support, and assistance with course selection, career and graduate school advisement, peer mentoring, and individualized tutoring. The mission of TRIO DSSS is to increase the retention and graduation rates.

TRIO Academic Achievement Center (Student Support Services), West Campus
Number Served 240

Brief Description
The goal of TRIO Academic Achievement Center is to increase the retention and graduation rates of participants and to assist in the process of transitioning to the next levels of higher education.

Student Support Services – Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (A STEM Focused Program), West Campus
Number Served 130

Brief Description
The goal of the STEM-focused Student Support Services program is to increase the retention and graduation rates of participants in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics and to assist in the process of transitioning to the next levels of higher education.

Student Support Services (SSS), Downtown Phoenix Campus
Number Served 150

Brief Description
The goal of the TRIO Student Support Services program is to increase the retention and graduation rates of participants and to assist in the process of transitioning to the next levels of higher education.

Student Support Services (SSS), Polytechnic Campus
Number Served 150

Brief Description
The goal of the TRIO Student Support Services program is to increase the retention and graduation rates of participants and to assist in the process of transitioning to the next levels of higher education through tutoring and academic workshops.

Program Components:
Each year Arizona State University allocates the Upward Bound program scholarship dollars to award to new and continuing students. Recipients are expected to attend three mentor visits and three academically related activities a semester, in addition to community services hours and showing proof of pre-registration and financial aid renewal.


A brief description of the institution’s policies and programs to minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students?:

Obama Scholars Program
The Obama Scholars program provides a comprehensive financial package covering all direct cost for students attending Arizona State University immediately following graduation from an Arizona High School and coming from families earning less than $60,000 annually.

Target Audience – Students from Families earning less than $60,000 annually as demonstrated through the FAFSA process.

Program Start Date: 2009-10

Approximate Number of Current Students Served 2009-2010: 1800

Program Components
Peer Mentoring – Program participants are required to meet a minimum of once per month with a peer mentor who serves as a clearing house to disseminate referral information and insight in successfully navigating the university system. Participation in five academic success program activities is required during the year. These activities can be academic programs/workshops and/or cultural/arts activities. The goal of the activities is improving academic skills and engaging in the activities of the university.


A brief description of the institution’s programs to equip the institution's faculty and staff to better serve students from low-income backgrounds:

The Obama Scholars Mentor program is designed to pair faculty and staff as mentors to recipients of the Obama Scholarship. All Obama Scholars mentors are required to participate in online or in-person training.


A brief description of the institution’s programs to prepare students from low-income backgrounds for higher education:

Hispanic Mother-Daughter Program (HMDP)
HMDP is an early outreach educational program for young Latina women and their mothers. The program is designed to raise the educational and career aspirations of Hispanic women. Young first-generation Hispanic girls and their mothers plan their academic and professional careers with skills acquired during monthly workshops, beginning in the 8th grade and continuing through the completion of a university degree, a ten (10) year span.

Audience Served: First-generation Hispanic/Latina students and their mothers from the 8th grade through university.

Program Founded: 1984

Total number of students served 09-10 academic year: 500 (100 current college students)

Program components:
HMDP is composed of 3 components – the 8th grade component, the high school component and the university component. Support for university students through HMDP include one-on-one advising, monthly brown bag lunches with identified topics of need for the students (i.e. graduate school, study abroad), scholarship mentoring program, student support organization, referral services for counseling and academic support. Additionally, HMDP provides scholarship support for incoming and undergraduate participants.

African American Men of Arizona State University (AAMASU)
AAMASU is a High School-to-College (H2C) Program and university student organization focused on increasing the recruitment, retention, and graduation rates of African American male high school and college students.

Targeted audience:
Current African American male (undergraduate and graduate) students attending Arizona State University, incoming African American male freshmen/transfer students, and local African American male students currently attending a Maricopa Community College, who are interesting in transferring to Arizona State University.

High School 2 College Program Targeted audience: Current African American male freshman high school students and their parents residing in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area.

Program start date: 2004 – 2005 academic year.

Approximate Number of Students Served 2009-2010: Student Organization: 75, H2C Program: 120

Program Components:
AAMASU is structured both as a student organization and High School-to-College (H2C) Program. Events and programs hosted by and for the college organization include a literary club, fall leadership conference, black male workshops, film series, and a Black history month lecture. The H2C Program consists of three cohorts – high school sophomores, juniors, and seniors. Arizona State University staff and students conduct various grade level appropriate workshops such as applying to college and scholarships, financial aid, college life, majors, test preparations, etc.

Upward Bound, Tempe Campus
Number Served 112 annually

Brief Description
The ultimate purpose of the Upward Bound Program (UBP) is to prepare participants to succeed in a program of postsecondary education. The project is designed to increase the academic skills and motivational levels of project participants to the extent they will complete high school and successfully enter postsecondary educational programs and graduate.

Veterans Upward Bound, Tempe Campus
Number Served 120 annually

Brief Description
The mission of Veterans Upward Bound (VUB) is to provide free academic instruction and career guidance that will enhance the veteran’s ability to succeed in their educational goals beyond high school. VUB is an educational program designed to meet the needs of the veterans who seek to improve their academic skills in English, reading, math and computer literacy. In addition to free academic instruction, VUB assists with financial aid and scholarship applications, directs veterans to Veterans Administration services, and helps them connect with the educational institution of their choice.


A brief description of the institution's scholarships for low-income students:

Obama Scholars Program
The Obama Scholars program provides a comprehensive financial package covering all direct cost for students attending Arizona State University immediately following graduation from an Arizona High School and coming from families earning less than $60,000 annually.

Target Audience – Students from Families earning less than $60,000 annually as demonstrated through the FAFSA process.

Program Start Date: 2009-10

Approximate Number of Current Students Served 2009-2010: 1800

Program Components
Peer Mentoring – Program participants are required to meet a minimum of once per month with a peer mentor who serves as a clearing house to disseminate referral information and insight in successfully navigating the university system. Participation in five academic success program activities is required during the year. These activities can be academic programs/workshops and/or cultural/arts activities. The goal of the activities is improving academic skills and engaging in the activities of the university.


A brief description of the institution’s programs to guide parents of low-income students through the higher education experience:

The American Dream Academy (ADA) Parent Education Program is a 9-week program that uses an intense, one-on-one contact model to create a community in which parents and teachers collaborate to transform each child’s educational environment at home and at school. The ADA helps parents to instill the value of education within themselves and their children. Through ADA, parents are given the tools to guide their children through K-12th grades and into higher education. This type of school based intervention empowers and trains parents to become effective advocates and partners in their children’s education.

During Sun Devil 101 Welcome Week, there is a Parents Reception where parents learn about resources and programs offered to them through the Parents Association and have the opportunity to meet other Arizona State University parents. Resources include a 24 hour/ 7 day a week parent resource phone line and an emergency crisis fund. We also host Family Weekend in October which includes programming for students and families so that parents can learn more about the student’s experience at Arizona State University.


A brief description of the institution’s targeted outreach to recruit students from low-income backgrounds:

Access ASU, an initiative of Education Outreach and Student Services at Arizona State University, is a catalyst for change, transforming Arizona's college-going culture by empowering students to invest in their future and attain a university degree. Through partnerships with local schools districts, Access ASU staff provides accessible information and support to schools, families, and students, grades K-12, on college-readiness, career guidance, financial aid literacy and college life. Using both on-campus visits and ASU college students, Arizona students are exposed to the possibility and reality of attaining their dreams of higher education. We focus on 6 fundamentals: encouraging academic readiness, increasing college exposure, promoting financial aid literacy, building student self-confidence, providing adult role models, & fostering parental support. We enable student success and increase the yield of Arizona incoming freshmen through outreach services at no cost to schools.

The Hispanic Mother-Daughter Program (HMDP) is an early outreach college preparatory program that aims to increase the number of Latinas with bachelor’s degrees. The program begins working with the young ladies and their mothers/guardians when they are in 8th grade to prepare them to be successful in higher education. HMDP provides monthly workshops for mothers and daughters/guardians and one-on-one advising to students and their home schools. Workshop topics include, but are not limited to, the following topics: preparing for high school, self esteem, effective communication, careers, leadership, financial aid/scholarships, applying for college.

Upward Bound targets low income students in 8th grade for a college preparatory program during high school.

African American Men of ASU works with high school students from districts with high percentages of low income students promoting high school completion and college readiness.

For more than 10 years, the Summer Bridge program at Arizona State University has helped new Sun Devils make a successful transition from high school to college life. All students take a 1-credit UNI 194 Academic Success Seminar along with two three-credit courses for a total of 7 credit hours. Course offerings vary by campus but typically include a Math, English, Critical Thinking or General Studies course. Students also benefit from the opportunity to live on campus during the program, dedicated tutoring services, and daily programming.


A brief description of the institution’s other admissions policies and programs:
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A brief description of the institution’s other financial aid polices or programs:
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A brief description of the institution’s other policies and programs not covered above:
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The website URL where information about programs in each of the areas listed above is available:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.