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The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 53.62
Liaison Michael Kensler
Submission Date Jan. 11, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Auburn University
OP-10: Landscape Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.19 / 2.00 Steven Johnston
Landscape Superindendent
Landscape Services, Facilities Managment
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Figures required to calculate the total area of managed grounds::
Area
Total campus area 1,845 Acres
Footprint of the institution's buildings 105.43 Acres
Area of undeveloped land, excluding any protected areas 523.03 Acres

Area of managed grounds that is::
Area
Managed in accordance with an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) Plan 235 Acres
Managed in accordance with a sustainable landscape management program that includes an IPM plan and otherwise meets the criteria outlined 0 Acres
Managed organically, third party certified and/or protected 0.19 Acres

A copy of the IPM plan:
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The IPM plan :

All areas maintained have a four-tiered management system, however all areas are not equal in tolerance and /or action thresholds. These thresholds are based on pedestrian traffic, tolerance thresholds set down by building occupants and historic importance of an area.
Our objective is to survey/monitor selected areas on campus and determine if the thresholds of a pest warrants chemical applications. Also, we incorporate best management practices such as aeration, fertilization and proper irrigation to promote healthy trees, shrubs and turf.
Based on our 235 IPM (Integrated Pest Management) acreage, an average of 10.5\5 pounds of actual N is used per acre per year.
This is calculated by the following method:
4000 pounds of 35-0-10: 4000x.35= 1,400 pounds N /235 acres = 6 pounds per acre
4000 pounds of 15-0-15: 4000x.15= 600 pounds N / 235 acres = 2 pounds per acre
2000 pounds of 24-0-5: 2000x.24=480 pounds N / 235 acres = 2 per acre
Total is 10.5 pounds per acre
Fertilizer applied once a year
The 35-3-10 Spread it & Forget it with Duration CR fertilizer used is a polymer coated slow release fertilizer.


A brief summary of the institution’s approach to sustainable landscape management:

Water infiltration is promoted by aerating turf.
Organic Lawn Care Standards are utilized in 8,400 sq. ft. of turf at The Garden of Memory. The division has a short term goal to increase the area where these standards can be utilized.
There are 47 self-watering earth planters currently on campus that reduce the amount and frequency of water needed in traditional planters.
LS recycles or reuses pots from prior plant purchases for propagation of new plants from the greenhouse.
For Earth Day 2015, LS partnered with Village Dining to grow plants in compost made from food scraps.
Water conservation measures include 22 Smart Irrigation Systems that cover 2,140,000 sq. ft. or 49 acres of the campus. In 2014, the water consumption in Level 1 attention area of Samford Park was reduced by 25,000 gallons.
This information was derived from metered usage between FY’13 and Fy’14.
Longleaf Pine Straw is used in landscape areas to retain moisture, suppress weeds and control erosion.
6,722 cubic yards of leaf volume was mulched and returned to soil on site, limiting the use of chemical fertilizers.
This is based on one inch of leaves on the surface mulched on site to one quarter inch of mulched leaves. Leaves are harvested twice a year, in the spring and fall

650 cubic yards of composted wood chips-leaves-grass clippings for future use in the landscape, use ice\snow melting compounds (on hardscape) that are safer for our landscape.

This is calculated by using a self-contained 14 cubic yard vacuum, measuring the total yards by total number of loads in the machine.

Protects and uses existing vegetation such as tree care practices to manage our existing trees.


A brief description of how the institution protects and uses existing vegetation, uses native and ecologically appropriate plants, and controls and manages invasive species:

Projects designed and installed by Landscape Services give preference to native plants, provided they meet the above criteria. The use of native plants in campus landscapes is likely to be reinforced by the campus landscape master plan currently being developed. The University's Design Standards also require native species for all new buildings. In addition, efforts are underway to eliminate invasive species, including an annual invasive species removal volunteer day at the Donald E. Davis Arboretum.


A brief description of the institution’s landscape materials management and waste minimization policies and practices:

Longleaf Pine Straw is used in landscape areas to retain moisture, suppress weeds and control erosion.
6,722 cubic yards of leaf volume mulched and returned to soil on site, limiting the use of chemical fertilizers.This is based on one inch of leaves on the surface mulched on site to one quarter inch of mulched leaves. Leaves are harvested twice a year, in the spring and fall.
650 cubic yards of composted wood chips-leaves-grass clippings for future use in the landscape. This is calculated by using a self-contained 14 cubic yard vacuum, measuring the total yards by total number of loads in the machine. When necessary, we use ice\snow melting compounds (on hardscape) that are safer for our landscape.


A brief description of the institution’s organic soils management practices:

Organic Lawn Care Standards are utilized in 8,400 sq. ft. of turf at The Garden of Memory. The division has a short term goal to increase the area where these standards can be utilized.


A brief description of the institution’s use of environmentally preferable materials in landscaping and grounds management:

There are 47 self-watering earth planters currently on campus that reduce the amount and frequency of water needed in traditional planters.

Landscaping Services also recycles or reuses pots from prior plant purchases for propagation of new plants from the greenhouse. Longleaf Pine Straw, a material indigenous to Alabama, is used in landscape areas to retain moisture, suppress weeds and control erosion.


A brief description of how the institution restores and/or maintains the integrity of the natural hydrology of the campus:

Auburn has restored a portion of Parkerson Mill Creek, which runs through the heart of campus, by daylighting it, restoring vegetation to the riparian corridor, and utilizing best management practices to slow runoff into that portion of the creek. In addition, there are a number of stormwater best management practices in use around campus, including bioswales, rain gardens, and cisterns.


A brief description of how the institution reduces the environmental impacts of snow and ice removal (if applicable):
---

A brief description of any certified and/or protected areas:

NA


Is the institution recognized by the Arbor Day Foundation's Tree Campus USA program (if applicable)?:
Yes

The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainable landscape management programs and practices is available:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.