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The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 53.62
Liaison Michael Kensler
Submission Date Jan. 11, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Auburn University
PA-3: Governance

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.00 / 3.00 Michael Kensler
Director Sustainability Operations
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Do all enrolled students, regardless of type or status, have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies (through direct participation or the election of representatives)?:
Yes

A brief description of the mechanisms through which students have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies:

The Student Government Association and the Graduate Student Association are elected, representative bodies for deliberation of issues and venues where issues important to students are raised, and programs and policies are decided. SGA and GSA are two formal organizations for holding dialogue with the administration.


Is there at least one student representative on the institution’s governing body who was elected by peers or appointed by a representative student body or organization?:
Yes

A brief description of student representation on the governing body, including how the representatives are selected:

The Presidents of the Student Government Association and the Graduate Student Association represent undergraduate and graduate students respectively on the Board of Trustees. They are elected to their leadership positions by their peers and serve on the Board of Trustees in their capacities as leaders.


Do students have a formal role in decision-making in regard to the following?:
Yes or No
Establishing organizational mission, vision, and/or goals Yes
Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives Yes
Strategic and long-term planning Yes
Existing or prospective physical resources Yes
Budgeting, staffing and financial planning Yes
Communications processes and transparency practices Yes
Prioritization of programs and projects Yes

A brief description of the formal student role in regard to each area indicated, including examples from the previous three years:

Organizational mission, vision, goals: Students participated in a Provost-led planning process to develop 5-year goals.
New policies, programs, or initiatives: Students participated in the development of a Smoke-Free Campus Policy.
Strategic and long-term planning: Students participated in the development of the university's 2013-2018 strategic plan.
Existing or prospective physical resources: Students contributed to the development of two new central classroom buildings, the first of which will start construction in late 2015.
Budgeting, staffing, and financial planning: Students are responsible, with advisory oversight, for budgeting, staffing, and financial planning for student government groups, and the University Program Council, a student-led programming board consisting of 11 committees that bring a variety of events to Auburn's campus; UPC brought Nelly, Kesha and Nick Jonas to campus this spring, 2015.
Communications processes and transparency practices: Decision-making is dependent on collaborative, inclusive processes that rely on open communications and transparency. The administration readily communicates with the student body and student leadership groups about issues, plans, projects, etc. A recent example is open communications and participation throughout hiring process for a new Vice President for Student Affairs.
Prioritization of programs and projects: Students prioritize programs and projects in student government and event planning, and in a range of student organizations. The Facilities Committee of the Student Government Association meets regularly with leadership in Facilities Management to collaborate about student-focused projects.


Do all staff, regardless of type or status, have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies (through direct participation or the election of representatives)?:
Yes

A brief description of the mechanisms through which all staff have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies:

Two staff-related governing bodies exist: Administrative & Professional Assembly for administrative and professional staff and University Staff Council for hourly employees. Both bodies are elected, and represent the interests of all staff.


Is there at least one non-supervisory staff representative on the institution’s governing body who was elected by peers or appointed by a representative staff body or organization?:
No

A brief description of non-supervisory staff representation on the governing body, including how the representatives are selected:

n/a


Do non-supervisory staff have a formal role in decision-making in regard to the following? :
Yes or No
Establishing organizational mission, vision, and/or goals Yes
Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives Yes
Strategic and long-term planning Yes
Existing or prospective physical resources Yes
Budgeting, staffing and financial planning Yes
Communications processes and transparency practices Yes
Prioritization of programs and projects Yes

A brief description of the formal staff role in regard to each area indicated, including examples from the previous three years:

Organizational mission, vision, goals: Staff participated in a Provost-led planning process to develop 5-year goals.
New policies, programs, or initiatives: Staff participated in the development of a Smoke-Free Campus Policy.
Strategic and long-term planning: Staff members participated in the development of the university's 2013-2018 strategic plan.
Existing or prospective physical resources: Staff members participate in Campus Master Plan development and the Design Review Committee among others; examples include landscape design in new health center area of campus and design review of new classroom buildings.
Budgeting, staffing, and financial planning: Staff members participate on a variety of committees and councils that include budgeting, staffing, and financial planning including the Concessions Board, which meets twice annually to review funding proposals and make decisions about projects to be funded.
Communications processes and transparency practices: Decision-making is dependent on collaborative, inclusive processes that rely on open communications and transparency. The administration readily communicates with staff as a whole and the Administrative & Professional Assembly and Staff Council about issues, plans, projects, etc. Recent examples include trustee selection and senior staff selection processes.
Prioritization of programs and projects: Staff participate in a variety of ways. Recent examples include initiating the process for Auburn to receive a bike-friendly designation, and developing a ride-share program.


Do all faculty, regardless of type or status, have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies (through direct participation or the election of representatives)?:
Yes

A brief description of the mechanisms through which all faculty (including adjunct faculty) have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies:

The University Senate is comprised of elected faculty representatives from every college and school. The Senate is one of the four key leadership in governance groups on campus.


Is there at least one teaching or research faculty representative on the institution’s governing body who was elected by peers or appointed by a representative faculty body or organization?:
Yes

A brief description of faculty representation on the governing body, including how the representatives are selected:

The immediate past-President of the University Senate serves on the Board of Trustees, and is selected by reason of the position of immediate past-President of the Senate.


Do faculty have a formal role in decision-making in regard to the following?:
Yes or No
Establishing organizational mission, vision, and/or goals Yes
Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives Yes
Strategic and long-term planning Yes
Existing or prospective physical resources Yes
Budgeting, staffing and financial planning Yes
Communications processes and transparency practices Yes
Prioritization of programs and projects Yes

A brief description of the formal faculty role in regard to each area indicated, including examples from the previous three years:

Organizational mission, vision, goals: Faculty participated in a Provost-led planning process to develop 5-year goals.
New policies, programs, or initiatives: Faculty participated in the development of a new health campus.
Strategic and long-term planning: Faculty members participated in the development of the university's 2013-2018 strategic plan.
Existing or prospective physical resources: Faculty members participate in Campus Master Plan development and the Design Review Committee among others; an example of participation in the creation of a new physical resource: the design of a new central classroom building and a creek restoration project.
Budgeting, staffing, and financial planning: Faculty members participate on a variety of committees and councils that include budgeting, staffing, and financial planning; the university is in the midst of considering a new budget model and faculty have been immersed in conversation about the new model.
Communications processes and transparency practices: Decision-making is dependent on collaborative, inclusive processes that rely on open communications and transparency. The administration readily communicates with faculty as a whole and the University Senate about issues, plans, projects, etc. Recent examples include trustee selection, campus renovation and construction projects, new hires for academic and research leadership positions.
Prioritization of programs and projects: Faculty are actively involved in a range of committees and councils that prioritize programs and projects. A recent example being the development of a natural resource area management program to protect natural resource areas from development.


The website URL where information about the institution’s governance structure is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.