Log In
  • AASHE-STARS

The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 50.57
Liaison Yaffa Grossman
Submission Date March 16, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Beloit College
PA-8: Affordability and Access

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.23 / 4.00 Lindsay Chapman
Sustainability Coordinator
Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have policies and programs in place to make it accessible and affordable to low-income students?:
Yes

A brief description of any policies and programs to minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students:

Beloit College is proud to offer several programs to help low-income students with access to college and the cost of college. They are housed within the Office of Academic Diversity and Inclusiveness, which sits within Academic Affairs and houses a number of different programs and initiatives focused directly on providing equitable access to higher education. The Student Excellence and Leadership (SEL) and the McNair Scholars Programs, both US Department of Education TRIO funded programs, use an asset-based model approach to work with students who are first-generation college, from low-income backgrounds, have a documented disability, and/or are domestic minorities. The Wisconsin Alliance for Minority Participation (WiscAMP) program works with minority students interested in science, technology, engineering and/or math (STEM). The Mellon Graduate School Exploratory Fellowship (GSEF) Program works with first-generation, low-income, underrepresented students in the humanities and social sciences that wish to attend graduate school. Finally, our Inclusive Success Initiative focuses more broadly on retention and institution-wide work around diversity, inclusion and equity.


A brief description of any programs to equip the institution’s faculty and staff to better serve students from low-income backgrounds:

College-wide goals on persistence and inclusivity have shaped training opportunities for staff and faculty. These include, but are not limited to: presenting research that individuals, task forces, and committees have compiled as well as provide structured opportunities through a program called Sustained Dialogue, to talk about issues of inclusivity, race, and power that are often associated with students from low-income backgrounds.


A brief description of any programs to prepare students from low-income backgrounds for higher education:

The Student Excellence and Leadership (SEL) and the McNair Scholars Programs, both US Department of Education TRIO funded programs, use an asset-based model approach to work with students who are first-generation college, from low-income backgrounds, have a documented disability, and/or are domestic minorities. The Wisconsin Alliance for Minority Participation (WiscAMP) program works with minority students interested in science, technology, engineering and/or math (STEM). The Mellon Graduate School Exploratory Fellowship (GSEF) Program works with first-generation, low-income, underrepresented students in the humanities and social sciences that wish to attend graduate school.


A brief description of the institution's scholarships for low-income students:

The SEL Program is designed to provide a network of academic, personal, financial, and career services. First and second-year students may be eligible for a financial award/scholarship from the SEL Program. Grants usually range from $500-$1,200 and are distributed during the spring semester. To be eligible students must receive a Pell Grant, be an active participant in the SEL Program, and attend a mandatory financial literacy workshop.

McNair scholars Program: A federally funded program (one of the TRIO Programs funded by the Department of Education) mandated by Congress. The goal of the program is to increase the number of students in doctoral degree programs who are low-income and first-generation undergraduates or students who come from groups underrepresented in graduate education. At Beloit, students earn around a $2,800 stipend by conducting summer research with a faculty mentor before their Junior and Senior years.

The Charles Winter Wood Scholarship, named after one of Beloit’s first African American students (Class of 1895), is available to students who have been traditionally underrepresented in American higher education. In addition to these scholarships, qualified Charles Winter Wood Scholars are encouraged to apply to TRIO, federally funded programs offering resources and opportunities to qualified students for academic success and scholarly research. Beloit is one of the few liberal arts colleges in the U.S. to offer three TRIO programs on its campus.
Award: Up to $40,000 per year, renewable for 4 years
Criteria: Low income (definition here), first generation, and/or domestic minority status • Record of academic achievement in a rigorous college preparatory curriculum and evidence of leadership and involvement • Students eligible for consideration will be recommended to the scholarship committee for review.


A brief description of any programs to guide parents of low-income students through the higher education experience:

The Upward Bound and Help Yourself Programs: Students must fill out an application for participation during the school year and/or summer program. Students are selected to participate in the Help Yourself Programs based on their desire to attend college, their economic status, their attitude, and their ability to commit to the program as a family.


A brief description of any targeted outreach to recruit students from low-income backgrounds:

The admission staff visits high schools that have high-achieving students who come from low-income, disadvantaged backgrounds. We also maintain and cultivate contacts at community based organizations that serve these students; these CBO's tend to have focused initiatives that steer students towards private, selective colleges and universities.

Upon admission, Beloit has a travel subsidy that underwrites campus visits for underrepresented, low-income students who could not otherwise afford to travel to campus.


A brief description of other admissions policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:

We also have formal group visit policies (www.beloit.edu/prospective/visit/groupvisit/) to accomodate groups of students, often led under the auspices of CBO's, who visit campus. We attempt to taylor our programming at these visits around not only the generalities of Beloit but also around things that may be of particular interest to groups, including financial aid, campus life, and support for under-represented students.


A brief description of other financial aid policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:

While Beloit does not have any policies about meeting full-demonstrated need, our aid programs have historically been (and continue to be) very generous in making Beloit an affordable choice to students who are committed to this kind of education.


A brief description of other policies and programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students not covered above:
---

Does the institution have policies and programs in place to support non-traditional students?:
No

A brief description of any scholarships provided specifically for part-time students:
---

A brief description of any onsite child care facilities, partnerships with local facilities, and/or subsidies or financial support to help meet the child care needs of students:
---

A brief description of other policies and programs to support non-traditional students:
---

Does the institution wish to pursue Part 2 of this credit (accessibility and affordability indicators)?:
Yes

Indicators that the institution is accessible and affordable to low-income students::
Percentage (0-100)
The percentage of entering students that are low-income 29
The graduation/success rate for low-income students ---
The percentage of student financial need met, on average 92
The percentage of students graduating with no interest-bearing student loan debt 52

The percentage of students that participate in or directly benefit from the institution’s policies and programs to support low-income and non-traditional students:
29

The website URL where information about the institution's affordability and access programs is available:
---

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.