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  • AASHE-STARS

The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 58.08
Liaison Kristi Wiedemann
Submission Date March 13, 2015
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Princeton University
OP-11: Biodiversity

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.00 / 2.00 Daniel Casey
Coordinating Architect
Office of the University Architect
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution own or manage land that includes or is adjacent to legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance?:
Yes

A brief description of any legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance on institution owned or managed land:

Princeton University does not own or manage any legally protected areas, Internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, or regions of conservation importance. However, the land bordering the Lawrence Apartments, the Institute for Advanced Study, and the D&R canal is a preserved wetlands and bird sanctuary.


Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify endangered and vulnerable species with habitats on institution-owned or –managed land?:
No

Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify environmentally sensitive areas on institution-owned or –managed land?:
No

The methodology(-ies) used to identify endangered and vulnerable species and/or environmentally sensitive areas and any ongoing assessment and monitoring mechanisms:
---

A brief description of identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:

The Washington Road Stream is a 1,400 foot stream corridor that lives on Princeton’s campus. Because of the growth of the campus, the stream began to show signs of erosion and lateral channel migration. In 2004, the Mercer County Soil Conservation District asked Princeton to stabilize the stream corridor. In 2006, the university trustees decided to carry out a “natural” stream restoration, rather than another mitigation strategy that would make use of artificial materials to stabilize the stream.

The stream was restored during the 2011-2012 school year using the Rosgen classification system; the Washington Road Stream was the first stream restoration to be completed in the state of New Jersey. The restoration was studied by Princeton student Theodore Eyster ’13 as a campus as lab project. The stream continues to be studied by Dr. Eileen Zerba, a senior lecturer in ecology and evolutionary biology.

Long-term data monitoring includes:
-Water quality
-Health and biodiversity of the riparian habitat
-Macroinvertebrate composition
-Potential future changes in response to stormwater runoff events in the now-modified geomorphology of the stream
-Continuous monitoring of the stream water level, including during storm events (e.g. hurricanes)

Preliminary results of nutrient composition, dissolved oxygen, and water clarity indicate a healthier stream environment compared to pre-restoration conditions.


A brief description of plans or programs in place to protect or positively affect identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:
---

The website URL where information about the institution’s biodiversity policies and programs(s) is available:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.