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  • AASHE-STARS

The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 74.63
Liaison Moira Hafer
Submission Date July 30, 2014
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Stanford University
OP-4: Building Design and Construction

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 3.00 Moira Hafer
Sustainability Specialist
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have any building space certified under the following green building rating systems for new construction and major renovations?:
Yes or No
LEED or another 4-tier rating system used by an Established Green Building Council (GBC) Yes
The DGNB system, Green Star, or another 3-tier GBC rating system No
BREEAM, CASBEE, or another 5-tier GBC rating system No
The Living Building Challenge No
Other non-GBC rating systems (e.g. BOMA BESt, Green Globes) No

A brief description of the green building rating system(s) used and/or a list of certified buildings and ratings:

The Knight Management Center (Graduate School of Business) was certified LEED-NC Platinum -- 360,000 sq-ft.


Total floor area of eligible building space (design and construction):
775,291 Square Feet

Floor area of building space that is certified at each level under a 4-tier rating system for new construction and major renovations used by an Established Green Building Council::
Certified Floor Area
Minimum Level (e.g. LEED Certified) 0 Square Feet
3rd Highest Level (e.g. LEED Silver) 0 Square Feet
2nd Highest Level (e.g. LEED Gold) 0 Square Feet
Highest Achievable Level (e.g. LEED Platinum) 360,000 Square Feet

Floor area of building space that is certified at each level under a 3-tier rating system for new construction and major renovations used by an Established Green Building Council::
Certified Floor Area
Minimum Level 0 Square Feet
Mid-Level 0 Square Feet
Highest Achievable Level 0 Square Feet

Floor area of building space that is certified at each level under a 5-tier rating system for new construction and major renovations used by an Established Green Building Council::
Certified Floor Area
Minimum Level 0 Square Feet
4th Highest Level 0 Square Feet
Mid-Level 0 Square Feet
2nd Highest Level 0 Square Feet
Highest Achievable Level 0 Square Feet

Floor area of building space certified Living under the Living Building Challenge:
0 Square Feet

Floor area of building space that is certified at any level under other green building rating systems for new construction and major renovations:
0 Square Feet

Floor area of building space that was designed and constructed in accordance with green building policies or guidelines but NOT certified:
415,291 Square Feet

A copy of the guidelines or policies :
The date the guidelines or policies were adopted:
March 1, 2002

A brief description of the green building guidelines or policies and/or a list or sample of buildings covered:

Brief project notes for the buildings included in this inventory can be found online on the Department of Project Management website (http://lbre.stanford.edu/dpm/our_projects). Only projects completed within the past three years were included.


A brief description of how the institution ensures compliance with green building design and construction guidelines and policies:

New construction and major renovation projects on the Stanford campus must comply with California Title-24 and California's Green Building Standards, as well as sustainability standards imposed by local jurisdictions. Therefore, a LEED-NC equivalency analysis is performed on each such project.

Stanford's Department of Project Management (http://dpm.stanford.edu) is responsible for the development, design and construction of major capital projects at Stanford University. DPM reports to the Associate Vice President for Academic Projects and Operations within Land, Buildings, and Real Estate, and currently includes a staff of 28 professionals with backgrounds in architecture, engineering, construction and cost management. These professionals serve as Project Managers and Project Engineers, Quality Assurance Field Inspectors, and Project Coordinators, who work as a project team that involves multiple stakeholders to ensure the successful delivery of facilities that support the University’s academic mission. Together with its colleagues in the departments of Sustainability and Energy Management (http://sem.stanford.edu) and Buildings and Ground Maintenance (http://bgm.stanford.edu), DPM strives to employ life cycle cost analysis and sustainability measures in the delivery of all capital projects.

For more information, please visit the following sites:
http://lbre.stanford.edu/dpm/PDP_Process
http://sustainable.stanford.edu/guidelines
http://maps.stanford.edu/fdg_available


The website URL where information about the institution’s certified buildings and/or green building design and construction guidelines or policies is available:

Brief project notes for the buildings included in this inventory can be found online on the Department of Project Management website (http://lbre.stanford.edu/dpm/our_projects). Only projects completed within the past three years were included.

Please note that Stanford does not have a blanket policy that requires LEED certification, but rather guidelines with equivalent standards and an emphasis on prioritizing selection of the most appropriate high-performance features for a particular building function. On every project, Stanford allocates budget to include high-efficiency transformers, energy management systems, and recycled water systems. Each new project targets 30% below Title 24 and 25% below code allowed water consumption. The decision of whether or not to seek formal certification lies with the particular school or department for whom the new building is intended.

In the majority of such instances over the past three years (the GSF of new building space addressed in this credit), however, the decision was made not to pursue certification under LEED-NC, and instead, to put the money that would have been spent on certification towards more sustainability features. It is estimated that Stanford would have spent $1.2 million in order to obtain LEED certification of all the new buildings within the last three years. Rather than paying consultants, contractors, and USGBC fees, Stanford used that funding to incorporate sustainability features such as heat recovery HVAC systems, PV installations, rainwater storage systems, enhanced building controls, and water cooled (instead of air cooled) chillers into its building portfolio. These significant features within Stanford's high-performance buildings add value without formal certification, which merely increases the cost of the overall project. By taking potential certification fees and putting them back into its projects, Stanford can leverage its resources to achieve a real and quantitative impact instead of a plaque and accolade.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.