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  • AASHE-STARS

The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 74.63
Liaison Moira Hafer
Submission Date July 30, 2014
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Stanford University
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Moira Hafer
Sustainability Specialist
Office of Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have current and formal plans to advance sustainability in the following areas? Do the plans include measurable objectives?:
Current and Formal Plans (Yes or No) Measurable Objectives (Yes or No)
Curriculum Yes Yes
Research (or other scholarship) Yes Yes
Campus Engagement Yes Yes
Public Engagement No
+ Date Revised: Nov. 5, 2014
No
+ Date Revised: Nov. 5, 2014
Air and Climate Yes Yes
Buildings Yes Yes
Dining Services/Food Yes Yes
Energy Yes Yes
Grounds Yes Yes
Purchasing Yes Yes
Transportation Yes Yes
Waste Yes Yes
Water Yes Yes
Diversity and Affordability No No
Health, Wellbeing and Work No
+ Date Revised: Nov. 5, 2014
No
+ Date Revised: Nov. 5, 2014
Investment Yes Yes
Other No No

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Curriculum:

The Provost’s Committee on Sustainability oversees Sustainability 3.0, a sustainability initiative created to identify and map a shared and actionable vision for sustainability at Stanford over the next 5 to 10 years. The Provost's Committee states in its 2013-2014 Sustainability 3.0 strategic plan that one of its objectives is to develop sustainability in undergraduate curriculum, including introductory courses and instruction packages for external use. This initiative also seeks to develop a certificate program focused on sustainability through Stanford's School of Earth Sciences.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Curriculum plan(s):

Stanford currently offers 487 sustainability courses and courses that include sustainability, but the Provost's Committee hopes to increase that number further. In fact, the Sustainability 3.0 strategic plan states many measurable objectives for advancing sustainability in curriculum at Stanford. The first objective is developing a Sustainability 101 online class for incoming students. The next objective is implementing interdisciplinary problem-solving courses on sustainability issues, from introductory "thinking matters" courses, which are taken by all freshman, to freshman seminars, to "helix" sets that are linked and coordinated across the university. These types of courses will require faculty buy-in, so Sustainability 3.0 outlines the creation of incentives for faculty participation in these courses as another objective for advancing sustainability in curriculum. Lastly, Stanford plans to enact "sustainability challenges and impacts" classes that explicitly link education and problem solving within the university as well as with partners outside. In addition to these objectives regarding new courses, Stanford also plans to enhance older curricula and programs to increase impact. For example, Stanford will reinvigorate its Green Fund by including staff- and faculty-sponsored projects that are focused on sustainability that students can implement. In addition to the money students will receive through the Green Fund to implement these projects, students will be eligible for research units as part of the incentive. Lastly, a sustainability certificate program is ardently being pursued by the School of Earth Sciences, with a consultant currently on board to advise on the development of the program and curriculum.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Curriculum plan(s):

The Provost's Committee partners on these initiatives with the Vice President of Undergraduate Education, the Haas Center for Public Service, the School of Earth Sciences, the Woods Institute for the Environment, and the Precourt Institute for Energy, in addition to other faculty members and school deans.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Research (or other scholarship):

The Sustainability 3.0 2013-2014 Strategic Plan includes an outlined goal to expand Stanford's solution-oriented research activities and link them firmly with decision making in the university and beyond. This action seeks to advance the positive outcomes of the Initiative on Environment and Sustainability, which helped produce such entities as the Woods Institute for the Environment and the Precourt Institute for Energy after its launch in October 2003.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Research plan(s):

Sustainability 3.0 lays out several objectives for its expansion of sustainability-focused and practical research activities. First, Stanford seeks to identify and fill gaps in faculty expertise, especially across the social sciences. Next, Stanford plans to analyze the successes and shortcomings across Stanford's research endeavors in an effort to link research with decision-making. Lastly, Stanford will engage the graduate community by creating strong connections between Stanford operations and academics in an effort to identify graduate research opportunities and incentivize graduate research contributions to campus-wide and global sustainability solutions. In addition to the above tactics, Stanford will implement new programs in the field of research to accomplish its objectives. For instance, the university will develop and carry out scholarly analysis of current and past Stanford research focused on interdisciplinary problem solving for sustainability goals, identifying what works and why in an effort to link knowledge to action. The university will also publish and share this experience locally to improve ongoing efforts. Lastly, Stanford will enhance its "Uncommon Dialogues" which bring together leaders from government, NGOs, and businesses with Stanford experts to develop practical solutions to pressing environmental challenges. The expansion of this program will create an ongoing dialogue among researchers and decision makers for sustainability and will help secure additional funding for faculty and students to engage in problem solving research in concert with decision makers. Work on these outcomes has been active in the 2013-2014 academic year.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Research plan(s):

This initiative is spearheaded by the Woods Institute for the Environment and the Precourt Institute for Energy.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Campus Engagement around sustainability:

The Sustainability 3.0 2013-2014 Strategic Plan outlines a goal of engaging the broader Stanford campus through outreach campaigns, training programs, and incentives. The outcomes of this goal will build upon existing programs, such as Stanford's Cardinal Green Buildings campaign, Stanford's annual participation in the nationwide Recyclemania campaign, and other building level programs that have been executed by the Office of Sustainability since its inception in 2007.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Campus Engagement plan:

The Provost Committee's primary objective for accomplishing this goal is to enhance the mechanisms through which employees and students can engage in existing sustainability campaigns and programs. As part of this endeavor, Stanford enhanced its Cardinal Green brand in the 2013-2014 academic year by tying together all of its sustainability programs and campaigns under the Cardinal Green brand. Next, Stanford's Office of Sustainability began development of an interactive web portal that will allow Stanford community members to access information specific to their individual and/or building-level participation in sustainability programs. Within these profiles, faculty, staff and students will all have the opportunity to find out how to get involved, and they will be eligible to receive incentives for participation in these sustainability campaigns. Development of this web portal began in 2013 and is set for completion by Fall 2014. Another aspect of this web portal will be the development of school, department, and dorm level sustainability report cards accompanied by incentives for participation in sustainability campaigns. These report cards will show not just energy budget allocation, but also that for water, waste, and behavioral programs. These report cards will help create awareness among entire schools, departments, and dorms and should result in fuller staff, faculty, and student participation in sustainability initiatives.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Campus Engagement plan(s):

The Office of Sustainability is primarily responsible for the execution of Stanford's sustainability campaigns and programs, with significant input from the Sustainability Working Group and direction and oversight from the Provost's Committee on Sustainability. The dorm-level report cards will be implemented by Stanford's Residential and Dining Enterprises Student Housing division.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Public Engagement around sustainability:

Stanford's Haas Center for Public Service places a lot of emphasis on community-engaged learning, especially in the area of sustainability. The Haas Center has plans to continue to engage students in the sustainability of the local community in this way.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Public Engagement plan(s):

Stanford is rapidly expanding its community engaged learning (e.g., service-learning) program in sustainability with the addition of a Director of Community Engaged Learning in Environmental Sustainability. This Director is consulting with faculty to expand the course offerings to students that allow them to engage with an off-campus community in the realm of environmental sustainability. The goal is to go from ~5 classes in the 2013-14 academic year to at least 11 in the 2014-15 academic year, with an additional 6 classes the following year. One goal of community-engaged learning is to increase student civic engagement with crucial public issues, like global change. Another goal is to facilitate the interaction between faculty, students, and the public around projects and ideas that are related to long-term (local and global) sustainability.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Public Engagement plan(s):

The Haas Center for Public Service is responsible for advancing sustainability in the area of public engagement.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Air and Climate:

Stanford’s long-range Energy and Climate Plan provides a vision for the campus’ energy future that dramatically reduces GHG emissions. Incorporating engineering and financial models, the plan demonstrates long-term cost effectiveness and sustainable natural resource use; guides development of critical campus infrastructure; and reduces economic and regulatory risks to Stanford’s long-term energy supply. The plan takes a takes a three-pronged approach to climate solutions, balancing investments in energy efficiency in new buildings, energy reduction in existing infrastructure, and a cutting-edge energy supply system known as Stanford Energy System Innovations (SESI). SESI represents a transformation of university energy supply from a 100% fossil-fuel-based combined heat and power (CHP) plant to a grid-powered energy facility with heat recovery and a robust renewable energy portfolio. Through SESI, Stanford will reduce its potable water consumption by 15% and GHG emissions by 68% from 2013 levels by 2017. The Energy and Climate Plan has thus put Stanford on a path to outperform all state, national, and global greenhouse gas reduction targets, making the university a leader in confronting climate change. The plan is updated with every major milestone, most recently in August 2015. The plan can be found online at: http://sustainable.stanford.edu/resources.

+ Date Revised: Dec. 2, 2015

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Air and Climate plan(s):

The Energy & Climate Plan was designed with the vision of applying Stanford’s intellectual and financial resources to provide leadership in climate change solutions through a long-term, holistic, and flexible approach. The first step in its development was a comprehensive analysis of current campus energy use and GHG emissions. Stanford has been accounting for and publicly reporting its Scope 1 and Scope 2 carbon emissions since 2006. In 2014, emissions totaled close to 179,000 metric tons CO2 equivalent. Using this data, campus growth projections were then used to create a GHG emissions forecast that informed the development of the Energy and Climate Plan. Given Stanford’s planned growth to support its academic mission, its large and diverse existing campus building inventory, and its historical reliance on natural gas cogeneration for energy (the main source of past GHG emissions), the Energy and Climate Plan provides a balance among investments in new buildings, existing buildings, and energy supply.

HIGH-PERFORMANCE NEW BUILDING DESIGN
Given the university’s significant growth plans, constructing high-performance new buildings to minimize the impacts of growth on campus energy systems and GHG emissions is a key strategy. The Guidelines for Sustainable Buildings, originally published in 2002 and updated in 2008, in combination with the Guidelines for Life Cycle Cost Analysis and the Project Delivery Process Manual, provide the framework for minimizing energy demand in new construction and major renovation projects on campus. Programs in place to maximize energy efficiency include:
• Optimization of current space through Stanford’s Space Planning Guidelines. Before undertaking any building project, Stanford first conducts a rigorous space utilization study to see if renovation of existing buildings can create space for new needs.
• Mandatory efficiency standards for new buildings, which must use less energy than the benchmark energy and water use of peer buildings .
• Guidelines for sustainable buildings that address site design; energy use; water management; materials, resources, and waste; and indoor environmental quality.

ENERGY CONSERVATION IN EXISTING BUILDINGS
Since the 1980s, Stanford has employed building-level energy metering of all its facilities to understand how and where energy is used in order to facilitate strong energy efficiency programs. Reducing energy use in existing buildings is crucial to creating a sustainable campus. The university has substantial programs to improve campus energy efficiency, including:
• The Energy Retrofit Program, which improves building energy efficiency and has led to cumulative annual energy savings of 300 billion BTU since 1993.
• The Whole Building Retrofit Program, which targets the campus’ most inefficient buildings for retrofits. Fourteen projects have been completed as of spring 2015, and 8 more are underway. The program has already achieved $4 million in annual energy savings.
• The Energy Conservation Incentive Program, which targets reductions in energy use through human behavior, rather than technology.
• Plug Load Energy Reduction programs, which reduce the energy consumption of the biggest “energy hogs” identified by Stanford’s campus-wide plug load inventory. These include IT equipment, lab equipment, and space heaters.

STANFORD ENERGY SYSTEM INNOVATIONS (SESI)
Since 1987, Stanford relied on a natural gas-fired combined heat and power (CHP) plant for virtually all its energy demand. Although efficient, its fossil-fuel based source caused the CHP to produce 90% of Stanford’s GHG emissions and consume 25% of the campus’ potable water supply. As a result, Stanford’s GHG reduction strategy focused primarily on transforming the university’s energy supply through a new Central Energy Facility (CEF).
The new CEF includes three large water tanks for thermal energy storage and a high voltage substation that receives electricity from the grid. A key feature of the CEF is an innovative heat recovery system that takes advantage of Stanford’s overlap in heating and cooling needs. In addition to the CEF, the SESI project converted the heat supply of all buildings from steam to hot water. This new system is 70% more efficient than the CHP plant. The efficiencies gained from the new CEF and hot water conversion, along with Stanford’s commitment to procure much of its electricity from solar, will reduce the university’s overall GHG emissions by 68%.

The plan can be found online at: http://sustainable.stanford.edu/resources.

+ Date Revised: Dec. 2, 2015

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Air and Climate plan(s):

Stanford's Department of Sustainability and Energy Management (SEM) along with management from the Land, Buildings, and Real Estate division that houses SEM, are primarily responsible for the execution of SESI and the long-term Energy and Climate Plan.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Buildings:

Stanford is continually guided by its original master plan designer—Frederick Law Olmsted, the visionary founder of American landscape architecture—and directed by Stanford’s Guidelines for Sustainable Buildings, which currently state that new buildings must use 30% less energy on average than current energy code requirements. Olmsted envisioned a resource-conserving campus that would respond to its climate and context to achieve beauty and functionality. The guidelines, which all new building projects are expected to follow, update that vision for today’s context. Ensuring that new buildings are as efficient as possible is essential to reducing campus greenhouse gas emissions, which is why Stanford has followed these strict guidelines since 2002, with revisions in 2008. Energy generation for heating, cooling and electricity in buildings accounts for 85 percent of Stanford’s carbon dioxide emissions—and from 2000 to 2025, we expect to build 2 million square feet of new academic facilities and new housing for 2,400 more students, faculty and staff. Through the ongoing advancement of programs such as the Building Level Sustainability Program (BLSP), the Energy Retrofit Program (ERP), and the Whole Building Energy Retrofit Program (WBERP), Stanford has developed strategic plans to reduce the energy consumption of its buildings significantly.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Buildings plan(s):

BLSP offers building occupants an opportunity to become leaders in sustainability by implementing sustainable practices in their office spaces. This program has continued to develop since its creation in 2009, reaching broader audiences and leading to increased energy savings. Since its inception, the BLSP program has served almost 70 buildings by providing energy audits, recommendations, and rebates for energy-saving devices like smart power strips and programmable timers. The Office of Sustainability's objectives for the future of BLSP include weaving it even more fully into the Cardinal Green brand in order to increase awareness, and to develop a building rating system in conjunction with BLSP that will consider many sustainability criteria to produce a report card for each building on campus. One pilot program for this building rating system has already been performed, and plans have been made to roll it out on a larger scale in conjunction with the sustainability web portal throughout the 2014-2015 academic year.

Additionally, one of the university's key goals is to recover 5–10 percent of the space in existing campus buildings. Studies conducted to date have found that many offices could recover up to 10 percent of their space. To encourage more efficient use of office space, Stanford requires selected schools to pay a charge for underutilized space. Several schools are working to reduce their space charge through efforts such as conducting master space plan studies and renovating spaces in conformance with the Space Planning Guidelines.

Lastly, the Facilities Energy Management team within SEM operates the WBERP and ERP programs. WBERP was allocated $30 million for major capital improvements to the most energy-intensive buildings on campus. The first overhaul, of the Stauffer Chemistry Building, was finished in June 2007 and resulted in a 35 percent drop in electricity use, a 43 percent cut in steam use and a 62 percent fall in chilled water use. It also reduced carbon dioxide emissions associated with the building by 762 metric tons per year and cut energy costs by 46 percent in the first 12 months. Retrofits on the dozen most energy-intensive buildings are also underway. Altogether, the improvements are expected to save $4.2 million annually and reduce total energy use in these buildings by 28 percent. This program operates in conjunction with the ERP, one aspect of which is ERP Express, a program to provide rebates for energy efficient office and lab equipment. Together with BLSP, one goal of ERP for the future is to increase adoption of the ERP rebates across campus. For more information, visit http://sustainable.stanford.edu/buildings.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Buildings plan(s):

The Department of Project Management (DPM), the Department of Sustainability and Energy Management (SEM), and Zones Management work together to identify opportunities for building energy efficiency and implement energy efficiency programs across campus.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Dining Services/Food:

Stanford Dining’s mission states, “In support of the academic mission of the university and in partnership with Residential Education, we proudly serve great tasting, healthy, sustainable food in a fiscally responsible manner.” As a result of that mission, Stanford Dining has integrated sustainability into all of its strategic planning processes, including guiding documents for dining halls, campus restaurants, cafes, and retail food services.

+ Date Revised: Nov. 5, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

A master plan for campus restaurants, cafes, and retail food services at Stanford was developed in 2006 based on a study performed on the current situation of campus restaurants, cafes, and retail food services at Stanford. The goals of the master plan were to (1) understand the impact of adding new retail locations as desired by various academic constituencies; (2) improve resource utilization (space & capital); and (3) provide a “level playing field” and platform for service provider success. Key findings in performing market research for the master plan were that the campus community (especially faculty, staff, and graduate students) were looking for healthier and less expensive food options. Accordingly, the Advisory Committee, reporting to the Provost, was formed to provide outreach, education, management tools, and contract guidelines to the campus community. In 2014, the Provost’s Committee on Sustainability evaluated methods of integrating standardized recycling and composting protocols into these café contracts. Visit http://lbre.stanford.edu/sites/all/lbre-shared/files/docs_public/DCPSM_mpfinalreport_Revised_v1.pdf

Additionally, sustainability factors into all the guiding documents for R&DE Stanford Dining. One such document states that, “As an award-winning environmental leader, Stanford Dining has a robust and growing sustainability program managed by our full-time Sustainable Food Program Manager.” It also continues on to discuss initiatives and plans in the following categories: purchasing local and sustainably grown food, resource conservation and management, waste reduction and recycling, and innovation and education. Visit http://web.stanford.edu/dept/rde/cgi-bin/drupal/dining/sites/default/files/2012DiningTourBrochure10_03.pdf

Finally, the following strategic objectives are published for the Sustainable Food Program: develop additional food-related curricula with faculty that explore theoretical frameworks through the lens of meaningful, practical, and hands-on experiences; continue to design awareness events and ongoing sustainability campaigns that align with and support the program’s strategic partners; expand opportunities for students to design, implement, and manage Sustainable Food Program initiatives; establish an ongoing initiative with faculty, researchers and student groups to implement creative design solutions that promote and encourage healthy and sustainable eating habits and behaviors in dining halls; fully integrate culinary standards and sustainable food purchasing metrics into internal reporting processes, with the goal of doubling sustainable food purchases by 2015; achieve 100 percent transparency for all food purchases, including origin, production method, ownership structure and labor practices. New initiatives being implemented throughout the 2013-2014 academic year include: grass-fed hamburger patties from Bartels Farms, local and organic milk from Straus Family Creamery, sustainable tuna from American Tuna, local and organic chard from Coke Farm, local and organic romaine from Earthbound Farms, and local and organic herbs from Jacobs Farm. Visit http://web.stanford.edu/dept/rde/cgi-bin/drupal/dining/sustainable-food-program

+ Date Revised: Nov. 5, 2014

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

Stanford's Residential and Dining Enterprises division oversees all food-related objectives, strategies, and programs.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Energy:

Given Stanford's plans for significant growth to support its academic mission, a successful long-range Energy and Climate Plan requires a balance among investments in new buildings, existing buildings, and energy supply. While the innovations in Stanford's energy supply are covered in the Air & Climate portion of this credit, the energy consumption of new and existing buildings is another crucial aspect of the university's Energy and Climate Plan that was developed in 2009 with revisions in 2013.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Energy plan(s):

First, constructing high-performance new buildings to minimize the impacts of growth on campus energy systems and GHG emissions is a key strategy. The Guidelines for Sustainable Buildings, originally published in 2002 and updated in 2008, in combination with the guidelines for Life Cycle Cost Analysis and the Project Delivery Process manual, provide the framework for minimizing energy demand in new construction and major renovation projects on campus. Second, while the university has pursued aggressive energy conservation for many years and has employed building-level energy metering of all of its facilities since the 1980s, the continuation and expansion of programs like the Whole Building Energy Retrofit Program (WBERP) is another key strategy of the Energy and Climate Plan.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Energy plan(s):

Stanford's Department of Sustainability and Energy Management (SEM) and the Facilities Energy Management team within SEM are primarily responsible for programs to reduce campus energy consumption.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Grounds:

Stanford has a long history of preserving its lands and plans to continue doing so, especially prioritizing the protection of endangered species through the guidance of the Habitat Conservation Plan.

+ Date Revised: Nov. 5, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Grounds plan(s):

Stanford's Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP), completed in December 2011 and formally released with the final National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) document in November 2012, establishes a comprehensive conservation program that protects, restores and enhances habitat areas; monitors and reports on covered species populations; and avoids and minimizes impacts on species and their habitats. The HCP also provides major new commitments of land protection, personnel, and resources dedicated to habitat conservation. The goals of the HCP include: (1) comply with the federal Endangered Species Act; (2) support Stanford's mission as a research and teaching institution; (3) coordinate multiple conservation actions; and (4) provide a 50-year framework to plan for future land use and to promote all phases of conservation. Also, Stanford's habitat conservation plan strategies include: (1) concentrate conservation efforts in high-priority areas; (2) establish long-term habitat protection; (3) protect and restore riparian areas; (4) enhance habitat areas; (5) implement a conservation credit system; and (6) perform monitoring and adaptive management practices. Visit http://hcp.stanford.edu

Implementation of the HCP began in Spring 2013. These formal preservation efforts supplement the ongoing efforts of Stanford’s Building & Grounds Maintenance Department to maintain Stanford’s grounds in a sustainable way. Examples of these practices include a tree relocation program, incorporating local and drought tolerant plants into Stanford’s landscape, utilizing IPM practices, and hosting walking tours showcasing grounds sustainability.

+ Date Revised: Nov. 5, 2014

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Grounds plan(s):

Stanford's Department of Land Use and Environmental Planning (LUEP) and Building and Grounds Maintenance (BGM) are jointly responsible for advancing sustainability in grounds.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Purchasing:

The Procurement Department has worked with the Office of Sustainability to develop a strategic plan for sustainability in purchasing in the coming years. For instance, in conjunction with Office Max (Stanford's office supply supplier), has developed a program to replace older printers on campus with newer models. The Procurement Department has worked with the Office of Sustainability to begin developing programs to distribute these upgraded printers to the departments who engage in proper recycling of printer cartridges.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Purchasing plan(s):

The Office of Sustainability, together with Procurement and Office Max, has begun developing plans to put on a campaign around Procurement. This campaign will focus in part around ink and toner cartridge recycling based on the idea of offering Office Max's printer upgrades as incentives. The Building Level Sustainability Program has already begun promoting the ink and toner cartridge recycling program on campus, but this effort will continue to be refined as the team is able to set in motion plans to allocate and implement printer upgrades, in addition to modifying other details of the current system.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Purchasing plan(s):

The Procurement Department has worked with Office Max and the Office of Sustainability to develop the above plans for sustainability in Purchasing.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Transportation:

Transportation demand management (TDM) remains a priority sustainability program at Stanford, with implications beyond the university’s main campus. Stanford’s Parking & Transportation Services is assessing various aspects of campus growth in its continued commitment to support the academic mission of the university. With projected job growth and commute trends in Silicon Valley pointing to increased traffic congestion, Stanford has developed and launched a Regional Transportation Planning Initiative under the leadership of Land, Buildings & Real Estate. Many new and exciting TDM programs have been developed as a result of this initiative, which includes a framework for long-term growth.

+ Date Revised: Nov. 5, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Transportation plan(s):

Within the context of long-term transportation planning, Stanford is expanding its relationships with the region’s public transit providers. This is being pursued to improve service coming to campus as well as help advocate for long-term funding and system improvements. This proactive approach will help encourage greater use of public transit by the university’s commuting population while enhancing the availability of public transit service for the entire Bay Area. As an example of how the university is pursuing this objective, Stanford recently became a founding member of the Caltrain Commuter Coalition, which is working to stabilize operating funds for Caltrain and build support for Caltrain’s electrification program.

In addition, the existing electric vehicle (EV) policy is undergoing a review as a result of the long-term transportation plan. This review includes assessing the number and location of charging stations to be installed in the future and determining charging-level options. In keeping with the university’s addition of new photovoltaic solar arrays on campus to increase renewable and efficient energy supplies through the Stanford Energy System Innovations program, one goal of the long-term transportation plan is to expand the number of EV charging stations on campus and to transition more of the university’s free Marguerite shuttle fleet to 100-percent electric buses.

+ Date Revised: Nov. 5, 2014

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Transportation plan(s):

P&TS operates all of Stanford's transportation services and resides in the Department of Sustainability and Energy Management.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Waste:

Stanford has plans set forth to comply with California's mandate to achieve a 75% diversion rate by 2020. In order to accomplish this, Stanford will strengthen its current waste programs by implementing new methods of recycling, working towards universal composting across campus, and continuing its work at the building level to spread awareness and create incentives for waste reduction, among other activities. The university is also working on a long-range waste plan.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Waste plan(s):

Stanford has several measurable objectives for waste reduction in the coming years. First, Stanford will build upon its existing recycling program by gradually adding desk side recycling to all buildings. Stanford will add desk side recycling bins at a rate of approximately 3,000 bins per year in order to achieve full adoption of desk side recycling within the next 4 years. This program is planned to begin in 2014 after pilots in operations buildings over the last few years. Secondly, Stanford continues its endeavors to make sure all recycling and composting bins are labeled uniformly. Stanford has re-labeled over half the bins on campus and will steadily continue to re-label the remaining bins over the next year. These labels clearly show what types of products should be put in which bins, and their consistency across campus will translate to higher levels of recognition among individuals and, in turn, improved individual recycling habits. Additionally, Stanford plans to expand its composting program to reach all buildings. Rather than the voluntary composting program that is currently in place, the university is currently developing strategies to pick up composting from each building, similar to its recycling services. This will allow all buildings to participate in composting in a more seamless way than in the past. The beginning of this program will be accompanied by vast outreach to make sure buildings are aware of the new composting options and to provide various types of training to make sure building occupants compost correctly. Lastly, the building rating system currently being developed by the Office of Sustainability will include waste as an integral part of the rating. The Office of Sustainability will work together with Peninsula Sanitary Services Inc (PSSI), Stanford's recycling contractor, to collect building-level data on waste generated and integrate it into that building's report card. This awareness campaign will be accompanied by recommendations on how to reduce building-level waste and incentives for doing so. This system will come online in the 2014-2015 academic year.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Waste plan(s):

PSSI is the entity responsible for waste collection on Stanford's campus. PSSI works closely with Buildings and Grounds Maintenance (BGM) and partners with the Department of Sustainability and Energy Management (SEM) on many of its sustainability endeavors.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Water:

Stanford's award-winning water conservation program has reduced potable water use by 20% over the last decade—despite continued campus growth—through commitment, dedication, innovation and implementation of a comprehensive set of water saving measures informed by the Water Conservation, Reuse and Recycling Master Plan, which was developed in 2003.

+ Date Revised: Nov. 5, 2014

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Water plan(s):

The Water Conservation, Reuse and Recycling Master Plan was developed in 2003 based on a comprehensive study of Stanford’s water use trends. It considers domestic water from the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, Stanford’s Lake Water System, and reclaimed water availability, and it considers both existing water conservation programs at the time and projected water use trends both campus-wide and by department to determine appropriate future water conservation, reuse, and recycling measures. The master plan lays out a total of 14 feasible water efficiency measures, many of which have been implemented to date. For instance, ultra-low flush toilet replacement, showerhead retrofits and urinal replacement were the top three recommendations, all of which have been implemented by Stanford and have contributed to the 23% decrease in total water consumption in the past 15 years. Additional steps in the master plan include Faculty/Staff Housing Water Audits, 50 of which were performed just in 2013-14, and converting the football practice fields to lake (non-potable) water irrigation, a measure that is currently being considered. Visit http://lbre.stanford.edu/sites/all/lbre-shared/files/docs_public/FINALStanfordConservation_Reco
mmended_Plan10_16_033[1].pdf.

Additionally, since the announcement of the drought in California in January 2014, Stanford has completed a detailed analysis of campus water use to review its water consumption and develop a set of measures to voluntarily reduce water use even further. This effort supplements the strategies identified in the master plan and shows that up to an additional 5% savings can be achieved through further conservation measures both behaviorally and operationally. Stanford's Water Wise campaign, launched in April 2014, encourages the community to adopt such measures as taking shorter showers and doing full loads of laundry, while operationally, Stanford will continue
to refine irrigation practices and implement other technologies. Stanford is also currently conducting several studies to determine the effects of its water systems on the sustainability of the university. For example, throughout 2014, Stanford surveyed campus researchers to determine the effects of mixing groundwater with the water the university receives from the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission. Additionally, Stanford has been conducting studies of the effects of Searsville Dam and Reservoir, and in March 2014 Stanford unveiled a new Resource Recovery Center that will study the potential of wastewater to produce both clean water and energy. These studies will continue to be analyzed to provide valuable insight into the future of Stanford's water programs.

Finally, the new Stanford Energy System Innovations (SESI) energy project, which came online in Spring 2015, will further reduce campus potable water use by another 15%, bringing Stanford's total water consumption down nearly 40% since its 2000 baseline. For more information, visit http://sustainable.stanford.edu/waterwise.

+ Date Revised: Nov. 5, 2014
+ Date Revised: Dec. 2, 2015

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Water plan(s):

The Department of Sustainability and Energy Management (SEM) manages Stanford's water plans.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Diversity and Affordability:

n/a


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

n/a


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

n/a


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Health, Wellbeing and Work:

BeWell@Stanford serves as the overarching health and wellness resource for Stanford University. By facilitating a culture of wellness at Stanford, the program encourages individuals, departments and families to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyle behaviors. The program is continually expanding its offerings to faculty, staff, and students to not only encourage adoption of its health and well-being programs, but also to directly incorporate sustainability into its offerings. Stanford also operates the Health Improvement Program, which provides fitness classes and other wellness activities to the Stanford community.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):

BeWell offers many activities that count as "berries." After the accumulation of 6 berries, employees receive an added financial incentive. Berry options continually expand to give employees credit for current healthy behaviors and allow them to focus on the healthy lifestyle choices that most interest them. For instance, in 2013-2014, employees' 9 favorite berries remained unchanged, while 11 more options were added for increased program flexibility. During this time, berries were added specifically in the 'Commit to Community" category, where there are options such as "Environmental Class" and "Environmental Self-Report." Additonally, the BeWell staff collect surveys after each class or activity to evaluate the effectiveness of that option and make improvements in future years. Lastly, in the 2013-2014 academic year, BeWell began offering an adapted version of its program to students. This program will continue to improve over time based on student feedback. For more information, visit http://bewell.stanford.edu and http://hip.stanford.edu.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):

The BeWell program staff work through Stanford University Human Resources and in partnership with the Health Improvement Program, which is operated out of the School of Medicine.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Investment:

The Board of Trustees’ Special Committee on Investment Responsibility (SCIR) is advised by the Advisory Panel on Investment Responsibility (APIRL), which continually works to address “substantial social injuries” by adopting social issue policies and proxy voting guidelines and engaging corporations. Methods include: holding written, verbal, and/or in person dialogues as necessary; notifying corporate boards and management of intent to disinvest or, if all other methods of engagement have failed to influence changes in business practices, use of divestment (such as the recent decision to divest from coal companies on May 6, 2014).


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Investment plan(s):

The university—operating through the APIRL and the SCIR—has developed certain Investment Responsibility Core Social Issue Policy Statements and Proxy Voting Guidelines which cover and address many current issues, including Environmental Sustainability. Where it has decided upon such a guideline, the University’s Statement on Investment Responsibility directs that the University will “normally vote according to existing University Investment Responsibility Proxy Voting Guidelines.” For example, in May 2014, acting on a recommendation of Stanford's APIR-L, the Board of Trustees announced that Stanford will not make direct investments in coal mining companies. The Board of Trustees concurred with the advisory panel that divesting from coal is consistent with the university's Statement on Investment Responsibility given the current availability of alternatives to coal that have less harmful environmental impacts. The resolution means that Stanford will not directly invest in approximately 100 publicly traded companies for which coal extraction is the primary business, and will divest of any current direct holdings in such companies. Stanford also will recommend to its external investment managers, who invest in wide ranges of securities on behalf of the university, that they avoid investments in these public companies as well. A student-led organization known as Fossil Free Stanford petitioned the university last year to divest from 200 fossil-fuel extraction companies as part of a national divestment campaign. The request by Fossil Free Stanford was reviewed over the last several months by APIRL's Environmental Sustainability Subcommittee, which met with the group, conducted its own extensive research and took input from other constituencies. The subcommittee's recommendation was subsequently approved by the full APIRL, the Trustees' Special Committee on Investment Responsibility and the Board of Trustees.

In the investment context, in addition to the action on coal, Stanford's existing proxy voting guidelines adopted earlier by the Board of Trustees mandate that the university vote "yes" on proxy resolutions asking companies to adopt sustainability principles, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase the energy efficiency of their operations.

Visit http://apir.stanford.edu to learn more.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Investment plan(s):

n/a


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in other areas:

n/a


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the other plan(s):

n/a


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the other plan(s):

n/a


The institution’s definition of sustainability:

In pursuing its academic mission, Stanford University is committed to being a leader in the research, teaching and institutional practice of sustainability. The university is therefore committed to following core sustainability principles in all facets of planning and operations so that Stanford can lessen its environmental impact, ensure a healthy community and contribute to global solutions. Targeted policies and practices—as well as individual, everyday actions—are essential to realizing our vision of incorporating sustainability into every aspect of campus life.

For more details, please visit:
http://sustainable.stanford.edu/principles


Does the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document include sustainability at a high level?:
Yes

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

While Stanford University does not have one overarching strategic plan, the Sustainable Development Study completed in 2009 as a condition of Stanford's General Use Permit acts as a long-term plan for the university's growth as a whole. The executive summary of the SDS can be found here: http://sds.stanford.edu/documents/SDS%20ExecSum.pdf.
Additionally, the Provost's Committee on Sustainability has been charged with bringing key leaders on campus together to focus on sustainability as a core value at Stanford. The goals of this committee are to encourage and promote collaborations among sustainability programs across schools, institutes, Office of Sustainability, and students; exert leadership across campus by engaging deans and the cabinet, and advising the Sustainability Working Group; and bring campus-wide issues on sustainability to the attention of the Provost and President and inform, advise, and converse with the Provost and President on new sustainability initiatives. The Provost's Committee compiles their own strategic plan each academic year that guides the sustainability initiatives at Stanford for that year.


The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainability planning is available:

The attached URL links to a report on President Hennessy's address to the Academic Council in April 2014. The address focused on sustainability at Stanford and featured a panel of four campus sustainability experts: Pamela Matson, dean of the School of Earth Sciences; Shirley Everett, senior associate vice provost of Residential and Dining Enterprises; Joseph Stagner, executive director of sustainability and energy management; and Fahmida Ahmed, associate director of sustainability and energy management. Hennessy's remarks--as well as the brief presentations by each panelist--featured not only Stanford's current sustainability initiatives, but also its plans to continue advancing sustainability on campus in the future.

http://news.stanford.edu/news/2014/april/academic-council-sustainability-041714.html

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.