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  • AASHE-STARS

The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 66.07
Liaison Colleen McCormick
Submission Date Feb. 25, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of California, Merced
AC-2: Learning Outcomes

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.95 / 8.00 Teamrat Ghezzehei
Associate Professor
School of Natural Sciences
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Number of students who graduated from a program that has adopted at least one sustainability learning outcome:
126

Total number of graduates from degree programs:
1,057

A copy of the list or inventory of degree, diploma or certificate programs that have sustainability learning outcomes:
A list of degree, diploma or certificate programs that have sustainability learning outcomes:

Bioengineering Undergraduate Major
Environmental Engineering Undergraduate Major
Earth Systems Science Undergraduate Major
Materials Science and Engineering Major
Mechanical Engineering Major


A list or sample of the sustainability learning outcomes associated with degree, diploma or certificate programs (if not included in an inventory above):

Bioegineering Undergraduate Major:
1. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within 
realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, 
health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

Environmental Engineering Undergraduate Major:
1. ENVE graduates will be adept at applying critical thinking, problem solving, engineering principles and reasoning, the scientific method, and teamwork to solve environmental resource problems and to restore and sustain the global environment.

2. An ability to design a system, component or process to meet desired needs within 
realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, 
health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability.

Earth Systems Science (Environmental Science and Sustainability Major):
1. Communicate to diverse stakeholders the major concepts and principles of Environmental Science and Sustainability, such as how elements of the Earth system are interconnected, the carrying capacity of natural systems, and how governmental policy and economics can both perpetuate and solve environmental problems.

2. An ability to employ critical thinking, quantitative and numerical analyses, and hypothesis-driven methods of scientific inquiry in the formulation of research questions, experimental design, application and use of laboratory and field instrumentation, and analysis and interpretation of data related to Earth systems.

Materials Science and Engineering Major:
1. An ability to design a system, component or process to meet desired needs within 
realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, 
health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability.

Mechanical Engineering Major:
1. Practice mechanical engineering to innovate with respect to thermal/fluid systems, mechanical systems and design, and sustainable energy systems in public and private enterprises.

2. An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within 
realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, 
health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.


The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainability learning outcomes is available:

Reporting is Academic Year 2014-2015

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.