Log In
  • AASHE-STARS

The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 77.43
Liaison Claudia Frere-Anderson
Submission Date Oct. 14, 2015
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of Washington, Seattle
AC-2: Learning Outcomes

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.56 / 8.00 Claudia Frere-Anderson
Director
UW Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Number of students who graduated from a program that has adopted at least one sustainability learning outcome:
5,768

Total number of graduates from degree programs:
12,946

A copy of the list or inventory of degree, diploma or certificate programs that have sustainability learning outcomes:
---

A list of degree, diploma or certificate programs that have sustainability learning outcomes:

American Ethnic Studies
American Indian Studies
Anthropology
Applied Mathematics
Archaeology
Art
Biocultural Anthropology
Biology
Chemistry
Chicano Studies
Communication
Economics
English
European Studies
French & Italian Studies
Gender, Women, and Sexuality Studies
General Interdisciplinary Studies
General Studies
Geography
History
History of Asia
Humanities International Studies
Jackson School of International Studies
Law, Society, and Justice Program
Near Eastern Languages and Civilization
Philosophy
Physics
Political Science
Psychology
Russian and East European Studies
Scandinavian Studies
Sociology
Architecture
Community, Environment, and Planning
Construction Management
Landscape Architecture
Urban Design & Planning
Curriculum & Instruction
Aeronautics & Astronautics
Chemical Engineering
Human Centered Design & Engineering
Materials Science & Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Electrical Engineering
Industrial Engineering
Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Aquatic & Fishery Sciences
Atmospheric Sciences
Bioresource Science and Engineering
Earth & Space Sciences
College of the Environment
Environmental and Forest Sciences
Marine & Environmental Affairs
Program on the Environment
Oceanography
Quantitative Science
Quaternary Sciences
Business Administration
Entrepreneurship
International Business Management
Public Affairs
Law
Law A
Law B
Law E
Nursing
Epidemiology
Environmental Health
Nutritional Science
Quantitative Ecology & Resource Management
Bioengineering (College of Engineering & School of Medicine)
Global Health
University Conjoint Courses
Bioethics and Humanities


A list or sample of the sustainability learning outcomes associated with degree, diploma or certificate programs (if not included in an inventory above):

SAMPLE SUSTAINABILITY LEARNING OUTCOMES ASSOCIATED WITH UNDERGRADUATE MAJORS:

AMERICAN INDIAN STUDIES
- Students learn about the rich range of Native cultures and the great range of philosophies and foundations of knowledge that shape those cultures, about the interactions between societies and the environment, and about understanding and appreciating the arts of those cultures.

ART - Division of Design:
- An understanding of the global context of design, including environmental, political, ethical and social issues that impact professional practice

BIOLOGY
- Social responsibility- Modern biology is deeply intertwined with societal issues, from genetic engineering to health care to global change. Students explore the social implications of biological discoveries.

CHEMISTRY AND BIOCHEMISTRY
- Have some awareness of the broader implications of chemical processes (e.g., resource management, economic factors, and ecological considerations).

GEOGRAPHY
- Ability to think relationally about such key intertwined concepts as community and economy, society and environment, and citizenship and globalization
- Ability to understand the relationship among regional economy, health, and well-being in regards to sustainability

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
- Deep understanding of change and continuities in global systems and how these relate to cultural, political, social and economic conditions and processes in major world regions
- Comprehension of major global issues and problems

ARCHITECTURE
- Students must have exposure to and some mastery of non-architecture disciplines affecting design solutions: the arts, the behavioral and natural sciences, and economics, to name a few.
- Incorporation of sustainable and passive 
systems that rely less on fossil fuels and 
power-based supply needs
- Relationships of buildings to site and climate, neighborhood and regional contexts, and the ethics of sustainability
- Social, political, legal and economic influences on design and construction

COMMUNITY ENVIRONMENT AND PLANNING
- Understand and demonstrate proficiency in a 
selected field of disciplinary knowledge and its associated methods in relation to community, environment and planning.

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT
- Understand the ethical dimensions of problems and issues facing construction managers. Understanding professional and ethical responsibility as a construction project manager.
- Established an elective course in Sustainable Building Design and Construction Practice to provide more in-depth coverage of sustainable construction practices.

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
- The department’s focus of “Urban Ecological Design” permeates the curriculum, with the key areas of ‘ecological infrastructure’, culturally-based place-making’, and ‘design for ecological literacy’ integrated in the students’ design education. Central to this focus, the department utilizes participatory design processes in its community planning and design studios. The urban ecological design focus, key area, and participatory design processes provide a robust foundation for emerging professional, social, and environmental needs and respond to the interests that students request for their education.

AERONAUTICS AND ASTRONAUTICS
- An ability to design a system, component or 
process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability
- The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental and societal context

BIOENGINEERING
- An ability to design a system, component or 
process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
- An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
- The broad education necessary to 
understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.

CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING
- An ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
- The broad education necessary to 
understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.

COMPUTER SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
- An ability to design a computing system, 
component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
- An ability to communicate effectively the broad education necessary to understand the impact of computer engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
- An ability to design a system, component or 
process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability
- The broad education necessary to 
understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental and societal context

INDUSTRIAL AND SYSTEMS ENGINEERING
- The broad education necessary to 
understand the impact of engineering 
solutions in a societal context
- Graduates will exhibit the following professional behaviors: leadership, ethics, social responsibility of engineers,

MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING
- An ability to design a system, component or 
process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability and sustainability
- The broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental and societal context

AQUATIC AND FISHERY SCIENCES
- Acquire interdisciplinary knowledge within the aquatic sciences; specifically, major themes of aquatic ecology, conservation and management, and aquatic biology and culture.
- Acquire supporting knowledge relevant to the biological sciences in physical sciences, law and policy, ethics and economics.

ENVIRONMENTAL AND FOREST SERVICES
- Understand social, ecological, and economic theory, concepts, and processes at a variety of spatial, temporal, and institutional levels.
- Understand application of ecosystem and social concepts along the urban to wildland gradient.
- Understand business, ecological, and social 
tradeoffs inherent in natural resource 
management and use.

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES
- The Environmental Studies major at the University of Washington offers a rigorous, interdisciplinary, experiential curriculum designed to prepare future environmental leaders to respond to bioregional and global environmental opportunities and challenges. It seeks to take full advantage of the extraordinary environmental research at the University of Washington, and make that social, scientific, humanistic, and professional expertise accessible to students in innovative ways.
- Students will learn… Public Policy & Decision-Making: Understand how uncertainty, risk, law, politics, ethics, economics and culture interact with environmental public policy and decision- making.

OCEANOGRAPHY
- Understand interaction of society and the environment, with emphasis on coastal, estuarine, and marine environments

BUSINESS
- Understanding of the ethical environment of business. Students will understand their own individual role in a business assuring an ethical environment.
- Understanding a global business perspective: Students will identify and the challenges and opportunities associated with conducting business in global markets Students will recognize and understand cross-cultural communication issues.

NURSING
- Describe the effects of health policy, economic, legal, political, and socio-cultural factors on the delivery of and advocacy for equitable health care.

PUBLIC HEALTH
- Describe key determinants of human health, including genetics, behavior, nutrition, social, geographic and environmental factors and how they interact.
- Explain political, economic, and social theories and how they account for variations in public health.
- Discuss how economic and legal forces influence both health inequality and processes of biomedical innovation, implementation and evaluation.
- Define and differentiate between the physical environment and the built environment and impacts on health.
- Describe how food systems and other human-environment relationships influence health.
- Describe how exposure to physical, chemical, biological agents in the environment influence health.
- Discuss issues of climate change, food security, access to water, sanitation, pollution, and impact on health of populations.

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH
- Making use of current technology and 
research-based evidence, define current environmental health needs and problems for the community
- Implement environmental health changes through application of technical, quantitative, legal, ethical, and behavioral knowledge and skills
- Provide comprehensive solutions to environmental health problems
- Recognize and become involved in 
opportunities for gaining public support for 
environmental health changes

SOCIAL WELFARE
- Identify the ways in which oppression, colonization, privilege, discrimination, and social and economic disadvantage contribute to complex human welfare problems.
- Understand the strengths and empowerment perspectives in social work practice, policy and research in order to promote social and economic justice.

ECONOMICS - Certificate in Environmental & Natural Resource Economics
An economics major trains students not only in deductive methods of logic, but also in inductive methods of reasoning using statistical methods and a variety of social and economic data....The departmental Certificate in Environmental and Natural Resource Economics is awarded to qualifying undergraduate majors with a “field of concentration” in Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.


The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainability learning outcomes is available:

While the University of Washington does not have a formal sustainability requirement, it requires that all undergraduate students take a minimum of 40 credits of Areas of Knowledge courses, with at least 10 credits in each of three Areas: Visual, Literary, and Performing Arts (VLPA); Individuals and Societies (I&S); and The Natural World (NW). These distribution requirements ensure that all undergraduate students obtain an understanding of social and/or environmental sustainability once they graduate. I&S courses focus on the history, development, and dynamics of human behavior, as well as social and cultural institutions and practices. Departments that offer such courses include American ethnic studies, anthropology, economics, geography, international studies, political science, psychology, sociology, and women studies. From departments such as history, philosophy, and religion, I&S includes courses traditionally grouped with "humanities" at other colleges. NW courses focus on the disciplined, scientific study of the natural world. The Area can be divided into three broad categories: the mathematical sciences, the physical sciences, and the biological sciences. Departments that offer such courses include astronomy, biology, chemistry, fisheries, forest resources, geology, mathematics, and oceanography. More information on these requirements can be found here:

http://www.washington.edu/uaa/advising/academic-planning/general-education-requirements/areas-of-knowledge/

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.