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  • AASHE-STARS

The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 77.43
Liaison Claudia Frere-Anderson
Submission Date Oct. 14, 2015
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of Washington, Seattle
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Claudia Frere-Anderson
Director
UW Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have current and formal plans to advance sustainability in the following areas? Do the plans include measurable objectives?:
Current and Formal Plans (Yes or No) Measurable Objectives (Yes or No)
Curriculum Yes Yes
Research (or other scholarship) Yes Yes
Campus Engagement Yes Yes
Public Engagement Yes Yes
Air and Climate Yes Yes
Buildings Yes Yes
Dining Services/Food Yes Yes
Energy Yes Yes
Grounds No
+ Date Revised: Nov. 16, 2015
Yes
Purchasing Yes Yes
Transportation Yes Yes
Waste Yes Yes
Water No No
+ Date Revised: Nov. 16, 2015
+ Date Revised: Nov. 16, 2015
Diversity and Affordability Yes Yes
Health, Wellbeing and Work No
+ Date Revised: Nov. 16, 2015
Yes
Investment Yes Yes
Other Yes Yes

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Curriculum:

The University of Washington's comprehensive Climate Action Plan (CAP) includes formal strategies and specific actions on how to advance sustainability in the curriculum. Examples of strategy recommendations in the CAP include "Develop Environmental Literacy," "Enhance Interdisciplinary Environmental Instruction," and "Explore the Boundaries between Disciplines."

Each strategy item includes a corresponding Proposed Action or Actions, which are in various stages of completion. For example, the proposed actions for the strategy to "Explore the boundaries between disciplines" includes "develop courses at the College of the Environment that are collaboratively taught by faculty members from multiple disciplines." This has been completed, as courses at the College of the Environment are often taught by faculty from the Evans School of Public Affairs, Health Sciences, the Foster School of Business, and many other departments on campus. Other actions, like "develop a high-level, trip-campus strategy for hiring, support, promotion, and tenure and merit criteria of new faculty with environmental sustainability focus" has yet to be completed.

More information on the University of Washington's Climate Action Plan can be found online: http://green.uw.edu/ess/inform/uw-climate-action-plan

+ Date Revised: Nov. 16, 2015

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Curriculum plan(s):

Develop Environmental Literacy
Enhance Interdisciplinary Environmental Instruction
Explore the Boundaries between Disciplines
Environmental Awareness
Positive Attitude
Positive Action


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Curriculum plan(s):

UW Sustainability Curriculum Committee, appointed by the Provost
http://green.washington.edu/content/sustainability-curriculum-committee


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Research (or other scholarship):

The University of Washington's comprehensive Climate Action Plan (CAP) includes formal strategies and proposed actions to advance sustainability in research.

There are numerous strategies highlighted in the CAP, including "foster undergraduate participation in environmental research" and "support junior faculty in new areas of environmental scholarship." The actions to implement these strategies are in various stages of completion, but are guided by the formal CAP. They include specific items like "Create a web-based clearinghouse for current environmental research opportunities" (a committee has been formed to develop this idea and is currently researching other schools efforts), among others.

Specific details, including the strategies and proposed actions to advance sustainability in research, can be found in the CAP on page 12: http://green.uw.edu/ess/inform/uw-climate-action-plan

+ Date Revised: Nov. 16, 2015

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Research plan(s):

Foster Undergraduate Participation in Environmental Research
Support Junior Faculty in New Areas of Environmental Scholarship
Expanding Environmental Foci to Professional Degree Programs
Fostering Collaboration between Academic and Administrative Activities


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Research plan(s):

Vice Provost, Office of Research (Mary Lindstrom)


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Campus Engagement around sustainability:

Outreach and engagement plans are outlined in our Climate Action Plan, section 2.3:
 
The university already disseminates a tremendous amount of information on its environmental and sustainability research, education and operational programs through websites, newsletters, annual reports, news articles, posters and administrative communications (e.g., President’s Town Hall). Specific, existing resources that are available to communicate messages associated with the Climate Action Plan include:
 
o   Websites for UW Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability Office, relevant academic programs (e.g., College of the Environment), and for UW Marketing
o   e‐communications;
o   Online calendar and weekly listserv of environmentally‐related events (both on‐ and off‐campus);
o   Competitions and peer challenges;
o   Sustainability toolkits for departments, instructors and K–12 teachers;
o   The university daily newspaper, UW Daily, and faculty/staff magazine, UW Today
o   Departmental newsletters;
o   News and Information releases;
o   Educational posters in residence halls, dining facilities and offices;
o   The university newsletter for campus neighbors, Front Porch;
o   The UW Botanic Gardens website, an important interface to the larger Seattle community
 
UW Extension provides sustainability courses that is available to UW staff and the general public.

Clean Energy Institute aims to accelerate the creation of a scalable clean energy future by advancing the next generation solar energy and electrical energy storage materials and devices, and their integration with systems and the grid. Supporting science and engineering research that sustains Washington’s leadership and economic advantages in clean energy.  The institute has the following goals:

· Advancing knowledge and invent technologies that will help Washington meet its greenhouse gas emission goals.
· Developing clean energy facilities, faculty hiring plans, and education programs that attract top talent to our campus and region.
· Growing our externally funded research portfolio and leading national-level Centers linked to solar energy, electrical energy storage, and their system and grid integration.

In 2013, University of Washington leaders shared their perspectives through a series of articles in the Huffington Post.  These articles may be referenced at:
http://green.washington.edu/climate-of-change/lessons
 
Climate of Change is the premier video series showcasing the University of Washington's sustainability efforts in the areas of research, teaching, co-curricular programs, and campus operations. This four-part series highlights the University's role in shaping how we teach students, develop research, and manage our resources for a sustainable society.
 
Finally, UW Executive Order No. 13, Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability, was approved by President Michael Young on August 30, 2012, and has been reviewed by the Faculty Senate, Board of Deans, the Environmental Stewardship Committee and the policy sub-teams. The Order, an umbrella statement confirming the UW’s longstanding commitment to sustainability, will serve as a guiding principle for future sustainability policy development and pursuit of the UW’s Climate Action Plan goals and objectives.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Campus Engagement plan:

Campus engagement to support the University’s carbon reduction strategies are provided in the UW’s Climate Action Plan, Section 4. (http://green.washington.edu/cap). The UW will reduce GHG emissions to meet or exceed the goals passed by the Washington State Legislature in April of 2009, requiring state agencies to reduce emissions by 15% below 2005 levels by 2020, and 36% below 2005 levels by 2035. The UW is hoping to achieve neutrality by 2050.

As part of the Climate Action Plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, the UW has created a sustainability pledge for members of the UW community and the Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability office measures the number of pledges taken as one communications metric.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Campus Engagement plan(s):

The UW Environmental Stewardship Committee provides recommendations to the President, Provost and Senior Vice President for environmental policies at the University of Washington, and oversees progress towards meeting the goals of the UW Climate Action Plan (http://green.washington.edu/esc). The committee is led by a Dean and includes other Deans, faculty members, staff and students. The committee is supported by the Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability office, a unit of Finance & Facilities, responsible for supporting university-wide projects, initiatives, reporting and program implementations to advance engagement with students, faculty, staff, community and the general public.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Public Engagement around sustainability:

The University of Washington's comprehensive Climate Action Plan (CAP) includes the University's formal plans for public engagement. Section 1.2 of the CAP lists the University's goals, which include "Expand the reach of the UW from our community and region across the world to enhance global competitiveness of our students and the region."

Several UW initiatives and partnerships, which are guided by our CAP goals, engage the public on an ongoing basis around the topic of sustainability:

- Bullitt Center/Integrated Design Lab -- a joint effort with the Bullitt Foundation that constructed the nation’s first-ever net-zero building in an urban setting
- Pack Forest – University trust lands that is accessible for public use
- Olympic Natural Resources Center
- UW Botanic Gardens (Washington Park Arboretum, Center for Urban Horticulture, Union Bay Natural Area)

The UW Educational Outreach program provides professional certificate courses on Climate Change and sustainability which is available to professionals in the general community seeking to further career development in the area of sustainability management.

The Environmental Innovation Challenge at the Buerk Center for Entrepreneurship engages with the community to participate in annual competitions and recruits members of the business community to serve as competition judges.

The UW Alumni Association partners with the Seattle Pacific Science Center to engage the University community and their families to learn about environmental and natural sciences through annual exhibitions.

In addition, the UW is currently working with the district community on a new, formal collaborative plan that will expand the University’s carbon footprint beyond its current boundary line. The “West of 15th Expansion” is assessing improving transportation, building effective partnerships with both the city and community, and re-characterization of urban water front.

Climate of Change is the premier video series showcasing the University of Washington's sustainability efforts in the areas of research, teaching, co-curricular programs, and campus operations. This four-part series highlights the University's role in shaping how we teach students, develop research, and manage our resources for a sustainable society.
http://green.uw.edu/climate-of-change

+ Date Revised: Nov. 19, 2015

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Public Engagement plan(s):

Public engagement efforts are ongoing for the UW. Where feasible, projects and new developments are coordinated and aligned with the University’s Climate Action Plan goals.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Public Engagement plan(s):

The UW Environmental Stewardship Committee provides recommendations for environmental policies at the University of Washington, and oversees progress towards meeting the goals of the UW Climate Action Plan (http://green.washington.edu/esc). The committee is led by a Dean and includes other Deans, faculty members, staff and students.  The committee is supported by the Environmental Stewardship & Sustainability office, responsible for supporting university-wide projects, initiatives, reporting and program implementations to advance engagement with students, faculty, staff, community and the general public.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Air and Climate:

In 2009, the Washington State Legislature approved the State Agency Climate Leadership Act E2SSB 5560, which established greenhouse gas emissions reduction limits for state agencies. It directed state agencies to quantify GHG emissions, develop strategies to meet the GHG reduction targets and report on actions taken to reduce GHG emissions. (See RCW 70.235.050 and RCW 70.235.060).
UW Executive Order No. 13, Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability, was approved by President Michael Young on August 30, 2012. The Order, an umbrella statement confirming the UW’s longstanding commitment to sustainability, will serve as a guiding principle for future sustainability policy development and pursuit of the UW’s Climate Action Plan goals and objectives. - See more at: http://green.uw.edu/executive-order


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Air and Climate plan(s):

The UW has committed reduce emissions by 15% below 2005 levels by 2020, and 36% below 2005 levels by 2035. The UW aspires to achieve neutrality by 2050. The UW Climate Action Plan guides us to that goal. - See more at: http://green.uw.edu/inform/uw-climate-action-plan


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Air and Climate plan(s):

The UW Environmental Stewardship Committee provides recommendations for environmental policies at the University of Washington, and oversees progress towards meeting the goals of the UW Climate Action Plan. - See more at: http://green.uw.edu/inform/esc


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Buildings:

In 2009, the Washington State Legislature approved the State Agency Climate Leadership Act E2SSB 5560, which established greenhouse gas emissions reduction limits for state agencies. It directed state agencies to quantify GHG emissions, develop strategies to meet the GHG reduction targets and report on actions taken to reduce GHG emissions. (See RCW 70.235.050 and RCW 70.235.060).
UW Executive Order No. 13, Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability, was approved by President Michael Young on August 30, 2012. The Order, an umbrella statement confirming the UW’s longstanding commitment to sustainability, will serve as a guiding principle for future sustainability policy development and pursuit of the UW’s Climate Action Plan goals and objectives. - See more at: http://green.uw.edu/executive-order


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Buildings plan(s):

The UW builds all new buildings to LEED Silver standards or similar sustainability standards. The UW has committed reduce emissions by 15% below 2005 levels by 2020, and 36% below 2005 levels by 2035. The UW aspires to achieve neutrality by 2050. The UW Climate Action Plan guides us to that goal. - See more at: http://green.uw.edu/inform/uw-climate-action-plan


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Buildings plan(s):

The UW Environmental Stewardship Committee provides recommendations for environmental policies at the University of Washington, and oversees progress towards meeting the goals of the UW Climate Action Plan. - See more at: http://green.uw.edu/inform/esc


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Dining Services/Food:

The University of Washington's comprehensive Climate Action Plan (CAP) includes specific plans and actions related to sustainable dining on campus. Proposed actions include:

- Continuing to source more local and sustainable foods, including from the UW Farm located on campus
- Increase availability of compostable service ware for department organized events
- Capture pre-consumer waste streams from large food preparation facilities at the UW Medical Center and Harborview Medical Center

In addition, as a member of the AASHE STARS dining advisory group and a member of the group that wrote the NACUFS Sustainability Guide, our goal is to advance sustainable food systems in our region and at all institutions of higher learning. Our main focus currently is that of outreach and education about our program. Whether we present at national conferences or to the campus faculty leadership group or to a nutrition class on campus, our message is to define what a sustainable food system is and inform our customers and colleagues on the leadership role our dining services is taking to advance sustainability.

More details can be found directly in the University of Washington's Climate Action Plan on page 50: http://green.uw.edu/ess/inform/uw-climate-action-plan

+ Date Revised: Nov. 16, 2015

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

We measure sustainable food and beverage purchases, waste diversion, outreach and education efforts and customer feedback on our sustainability practices. Our waste diversion goals within UW Dining are aligned with the campus, which is to achieve a 70% waste diversion rate by the year 2020. We are striving for 100% compostable take out containers in all of our food platforms.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

Kara Carlson, Business and Sustainability Manager, UW Housing & Food Services


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Energy:

In 2009, the Washington State Legislature approved the State Agency Climate Leadership Act E2SSB 5560, which established greenhouse gas emissions reduction limits for state agencies. It directed state agencies to quantify GHG emissions, develop strategies to meet the GHG reduction targets and report on actions taken to reduce GHG emissions. (See RCW 70.235.050 and RCW 70.235.060).
UW Executive Order No. 13, Environmental Stewardship and Sustainability, was approved by President Michael Young on August 30, 2012. The Order, an umbrella statement confirming the UW’s longstanding commitment to sustainability, will serve as a guiding principle for future sustainability policy development and pursuit of the UW’s Climate Action Plan goals and objectives. - See more at: http://green.uw.edu/executive-order


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Energy plan(s):

The UW has committed reduce emissions by 15% below 2005 levels by 2020, and 36% below 2005 levels by 2035. The UW aspires to achieve neutrality by 2050. The UW Climate Action Plan guides us to that goal. - See more at: http://green.uw.edu/inform/uw-climate-action-plan


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Energy plan(s):

The UW Environmental Stewardship Committee provides recommendations for environmental policies at the University of Washington, and oversees progress towards meeting the goals of the UW Climate Action Plan. - See more at: http://green.uw.edu/inform/esc


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Grounds:

The Grounds Management staff in Facilities Maintenance and Construction are committed to continually looking at ways to reduce our energy and utility impacts on campus, both in the way we operate and the products that we use. We have ongoing efforts to reduce our water use by automating the way we irrigate the grounds and utilizing the most water efficient products that are installed. Plant selection also has a great impact on the amount of water that is required on campus, identifying native and xeriscape plantings in landscape design plans to help reduce our watering requirements. We are also supporting storm water management efforts that help reduce the contaminants that could potentially end up in our salmon-bearing waterways, as well as reducing the University's contribution to waste water treatment by separating out our combined storm/sanitary sewer systems. Grounds Management also maintains its own compost facility that utilizes viable campus green waste (leaves and coffee grounds), that helps divert some of the University's waste stream from going to the landfill. In addition, we are systematically changing out some of our gasoline fleet vehicles to more efficient electric utility vehicles that have a much smaller carbon footprint.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Grounds plan(s):

1. Irrigation water usage reductions on an annual basis.
2. Number of combined storm/sanitary sewer systems that are separated.
3. Amount of leaves and post consumer coffee grounds that are captured for compost development on an annual basis.
4. Reduction of gasoline consumption in our grounds operations (translates to carbon emission reduction).


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Grounds plan(s):

Howard Nakase, Facilities Maintenance and Construction - Grounds Management


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Purchasing:

Procurement Services is committed to expanding campus access and awareness of goods and services meeting sustainability standards. Sustainability requirements shall be included in all University-wide contract solicitations and depending on the commodity, requirements may include criteria for:
•Energy efficiency, such as Energy Star and EPEAT ratings
•Green Seal, Ecologo certified or other independent eco-labeling certifications
•Low VOC and Greenguard indoor quality pollution certifications
•Waste reduction
•Trade-ins – supplier take back programs
•Reclamation services
•Reusable, refillable packaging
•Recycled content, including EPA requirements
•Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification
•Packing material reduction
•Responsible delivery and transportation process and plan
•Reduced paper use via e-Procurement or electronic payment vouchering
•Certification that sweat shop labor not be used
•Whenever possible purchase organic and local (in state) produce
•Electronic and paperless processes and web-based catalogs
•Credit requirements set forth by LEED (Leadership in Energy an Environmental Design) into product and service sourcing and procurement
•Contract suppliers will be required to provide a corporate sustainability plan for publication on the University’s Procurement Services web-site and to provide annual reports of EPP products purchased against the contract
•Products shall meet or exceed the efficiency standards identified in Chapter 19.260 RCW
•Bidders are required to submit proposals using recycled paper and doubled sided copying to minimize waste
•Bidders are required to complete a Green Profile questionnaire and report any citations for non compliance with environmental or safety issues
•Where environmentally preferable products and services do not exist, the University will work with suppliers to identify and develop opportunities
Procurement Policies and Procedures provide guidance for buying staff to ensure they consider sustainability elements when establishing contract.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Purchasing plan(s):

Procurement Services has created an annual performance metric for EPP purchases, copy paper reduction, energy efficient appliances, computer purchases and electronics. Annual or quarterly business reviews are scheduled with University contract suppliers and a standing topic is sustainability and supplier diversity. Suppliers within our eProcurement catalog environment are asked to identify products meeting sustainabiility classifications. Many have developed separate listing of these products to make it easier for campus to choose environmentally responsible products.
Procurement Services maintains a list of contract suppliers who offer sustainable products and publishes this on our Procurement Services website.
Opportunities to increase awareness and purchases of sustainable products in an on-going activity within Procurement Services.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Purchasing plan(s):

Procurement Services, Claudia Christensen, Procurement Manager


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Transportation:

The mission of Transportation Services is to provide innovative and sustainable transportation solutions that facilitate the education, research, cultural, and service missions of the University. Championing environmental stewardship is one of our core objectives in our work.

Transportation Services is currently undertaking the development of a detailed Climate Action Plan for campus commuting and departmental operations (including operation of the university's fleet). This builds on the transportation strategies already included in the university-wide Climate Action Plan. This departmental plan of action will be complete in the summer of 2014.

Increasing the trips to and on campus made on foot and by bicycle is a strategic focus for Transportation Services and a principle that has been included in recent planning efforts championed by the Office of Planning and Budgeting, including the Campus Landscape Framework and Wayfinding projects.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Transportation plan(s):

Baseline emissions for commuting and fleet use were established in 2005 and have been measured ever since. This is the primary means for tracking our progress towards the goal of carbon neutrality by 2050. We have already met our 2020 emissions reduction goals for commuting.

As part of the Transportation Services Climate Action Plan, additional measurable objectives, strategies, and time frames are being developed.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Transportation plan(s):

Transportation Services


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Waste:

Our diversion rate is currently 61% with a stated goal of 70% by 2020! We have conducted enough waste sorts to know where opportunities lie. Of the 40% of waste we are still sending to the landfill,
• 21% is compostable
• 9% is recyclable
• 10% is actual trash

The University of Washington's comprehensive Climate Action Plan (CAP) includes strategies and proposed actions to advance sustainability in waste on campus. The plan focuses on the development of programs that help maximize diversion and minimize contamination. Some focused initiatives from the plan include:

Educational Outreach
--Increase promotion of the Recycling Roadshow, a presentation that provides recycling and compost education directly to the campus community
--Continue to foster the development of the student driven RecycleMania planning committee to increase campus-wide promotion of and participation in the national recycling competition. We want to continue to lead Pac-12 schools in overall recycling and increase our ranking among Universities nationwide.
--Development of programs for our international student population
--Continue to improve and update educational materials and signage by collaborating with campus partners, with a specific focus on uniformity of appearance and message.

MiniMax
--Continue to minimize waste and maximize recycling by increasing participation in the use of this self-service, desk-side waste collection system, with the goal of having 55% of campus buildings converted to MiniMax by the end of fiscal year 2015.

Improved Recycling/Composting Infrastructure
--Effective January 1, 2015, the City of Seattle implemented an ordinance banning recycling and compost from the landfill from commercial customers. As a commercial customer within the City, the UW, has to comply and provide needed infrastructural improvement. Thus, in 2015 we will continue to identify needs for improved recycling and composting infrastructure on campus that will increase opportunities for post-consumer recycling and composting. This includes the installations of more BigBelly Solar Compactors in outdoor spaces and more installations of compost containers throughout campus buildings and cafes.

To read more about the City ordinances visit:
Commercial Recyclables
http://www.seattle.gov/util/forbusinesses/solidwaste/garbagebusinesses/commercial/banordinance/
Compost Ban
http://www.seattle.gov/util/MyServices/FoodYard/HouseResidents/CompostRequirement/index.htm

Increase Recycling Diversion from In-House Construction Projects
--We will collaborate with Facilities Maintenance & Construction on an education plan and refined operational system to encourage increased recycling diversion from in-house construction projects.

Service and Routing Efficiencies
--Refine collection services and routing schedules for increased efficiencies and improved customer service including converting more buildings to single-stream recycling.

The University's sustainability plans for waste can be found on page 53 of the CAP: http://green.uw.edu/ess/inform/uw-climate-action-plan

+ Date Revised: Nov. 16, 2015

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Waste plan(s):

Our overall goal is 70% waste diversion by 2020. However, in order to ensure we are on the right path we have established smaller, incremental goals. Our goal for fiscal year 2014 was 61% (which we met). Our goal for fiscal year 2015 is 63%.

This measure ‘s performance can be viewed here: http://green.uw.edu/dashboard/landfill-reduction

Additionally, we have a stated goal of 55% of campus converted to our MiniMax program by end of fiscal year 2015. Currently, 50% of campus buildings have been converted.

Read about MiniMax program here: http://www.washington.edu/facilities/building/recyclingandsolidwaste/minimax


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Waste plan(s):

Emily Newcomer, UW Recycling in collaboration with other departments--Custodial Services, Housing & Food Services, and Grounds.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Water:

The UW strives to reduce water use and improve water quality. The UW Facilities Services Focus on Environmental Sustainability highlights past water conservation achievements and future goals. http://www.washington.edu/facilities/files/documents/Sustainability/FS_Focus_on_Sustainability_2012_hires.pdf


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Water plan(s):

• The UW has strived to reduce Seattle central campus total water use by a minimum of 1 percent per year. This measure’s performance can be viewed on page 20 of UW F2 Operational Performance Dashboard at https://f2.washington.edu/sites/default/files/dashboards/f2-op-dash-v03.2013.pdf . Some water reduction strategies being implemented include installation of irrigation and cooling tower submeters, replacement of cooling towers, optimization of cooling tower blowdown, replacing single-pass city-water cooled equipment, irrigation best practices including networked controllers and low-water use plantings, re-use of Reverse Osmosis reject water at a cooling tower, installation of lab faucet aerators, rainwater harvesting for irrigation and laundry makeup.

• The UW has strived to improve water quality. Some water quality strategies being implemented include installation of bioswales and bioretention treatment trains, planter cells, underground cartridge systems for surface water runoff, separation of combined storm sewer systems, and Salmon-Safe certification.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Water plan(s):

UW Facilities Services


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Diversity and Affordability:

The Diversity Blueprint is a University-wide comprehensive planning and assessment tool, which covers all aspects of campus diversity, including low income students. The Diversity Blueprint has six goals encompassing major areas of emphasis for diversity: leadership and governance; student, faculty and staff diversity; curriculum and research; and institutional and classroom climate. For each goal, there are strategic priorities and recommended action steps for both administrative and academic units and persons who will be accountable for oversight and progress.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

The Diversity Plan has metrics, strategies and timeframes for these goal areas and selected strategies:

1) Provide leadership and communicate commitment to diversity
a. Build diversity into mission of unit
b. Include diversity resources on home page of unit
c. Set up and sustain a diversity committee
d. Develop and implement a unit diversity plan
e. Include progress on diversity goals in performance evaluations for administrators
2) Attract, retain, and graduate a diverse and excellent student body
a. Establish collaborative relationships between central recruitment and outreach
services and departments to better coordinate K-12 pipeline programs and
initiatives and to connect potential students to academic departments for
follow-up
b. Explore multiple mechanisms and funding opportunities to expand recruitment
and retention of underrepresented and low-income students
c. Increase funding for graduate students in order to recruit, retain, and graduate a more diverse group of students
d. Provide comprehensive financial aid packages that will enable students to
earn degrees and implement proactive advising of students to ensure financial
literacy and management of resources
3) Provide rich learning experiences and prepare students for global citizenship
a. Provide adequate scholarship assistance and support infrastructure to ensure
access to and success in high impact educational experiences for underrepresented
students
b. Increase underrepresented student interaction with faculty particularly in areas
such as career advising, mentorship for graduate and professional study,
internships, and professional development opportunities
c. Create new courses and transform existing courses focused on US and global
diversity issues and their intersections
4) Attract and retain a diverse faculty and staff
a. Craft position descriptions to attract a diverse pool of candidates; emphasize
diversity expertise and research priorities in position descriptions
b. Utilize availability data and applicant flow information in faculty and staff hiring
processes to monitor and improve applicant pool
c. Create a departmental toolkit and training for staff recruiting and workplace
diversity, with attention to recruitment strategies, interviewing, orientation,
career advancement, and succession planning
d. Offer workshops for underrepresented junior faculty members to clarify the
tenure and promotion processes, including third-year reviews, annual reports,
and compilation of tenure files
5) Encourage and support diversity research
a. Enhance central funding to diversity research institutes to support new research
projects and faculty-led conferences and speaker series
b. Create new university professorships for diversity research
c. Assist faculty members to address National Science Foundation “Broader
Impacts” Criterion for grants (broadening participation of underrepresented
groups)
6) Create and sustain a welcoming climate for diversity
a. Conduct periodic assessment of climate for students, faculty, and staff and address issues that surface
b. Provide leadership workshops for department chairs and unit managers to
focus on departmental climate and its impact on faculty and staff from diverse
backgrounds

Data is collected and analyzed every two years and action steps reevaluated and revised. Metrics include participation rates and highlight differential patterns.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

The Vice President and Vice Provost for Minority Affairs and Diversity; Provost and Chancellors; and Deans and Vice Chancellors.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Health, Wellbeing and Work:

In January 2014, the University of Washington launched The Whole U, a new programming concept that blends community building, employee engagement, and wellness by leveraging University resources and prosocial behavior inherent in employees in higher ed.

The Whole U is a holistic employee engagement strategy that emphasizes community building, appreciation of the diverse lifestyles and interests of our faculty and staff, and participation in programs that promote healthy lifestyles and personal growth.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):

The Whole U has tracked 17,621 interactions with participants via live events, social groups, virtual training opportunities, social media interactions, and through memberships in The Whole U Fitness Network since it launched on January 2, 2014. – December 31, 2015. The Whole U website averages 1,016 page views per day.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):

The Whole U is housed in UW Human Resources and reports to the VP of Human Resources, Mindy Kornberg. The program is directed by Kimberly Mishra.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Investment:

The University of Washington's Treasury Department, in conjunction with Divest UW, a student campaign representing over 20 registered student organizations, developed the Treasury's Global Climate Change Initiatives, the University's formal plan to advance sustainable investment. The details of the plan include:

1. Create New Research Assistant (RA) Position: This new student position will focus on the evaluation of alternative energy and ESG (environmental, social, and corporate governance) investment opportunities.

2. Increase alternative energy investments: Approximately $12 million or 0.5% of the CEF is currently invested in alternative energy through private equity managers. The UW investment team will commit up to an additional $25 million (or 1% of the CEF) to new alternative energy investments.

3. Incorporate ESG factors into investment analysis and decision making: The Treasury Office will dedicate resources to better understand ESG factors (including environmental impact) and their bearing on investment performance. This effort will include, but is not limited to, (a) discussions with peer institutions on their experience, (b) canvasing the growing body of research focused on this area, and (c) increasing awareness through participation in national forums (i.e., The Forum for Sustainable and Responsible Investment; the University Consortium on Investor Responsibility).

4. Explore opportunities for shareholder advocacy on climate change: This might include, but is not limited to, (a) collaboration with other institutional investors on letter writing campaigns and shareholder proxies targeting fossil fuel companies, (b) leveraging efforts with national organizations where appropriate (i.e., the Carbon Disclosure Project; Ceres), and (c) directing portfolio managers to consider the impact of ESG factors on their portfolio investments. Some of these measures would require the approval of UW senior administration and the Board of Regents.

5. Establish a framework for future engagement with students.

+ Date Revised: Nov. 19, 2015

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Investment plan(s):

1. Create New Research Assistant (RA) Position: This new student position will focus on the evaluation of alternative energy and ESG (environmental, social, and corporate governance) investment opportunities. TIMEFRAME: Position advertised in Fall 2013. Position Hired in January 2014. This objective has now been accomplished.

2. Increase alternative energy investments: Approximately $12 million or 0.5% of the CEF is currently invested in alternative energy through private equity managers. The UW investment team will commit up to an additional $25 million (or 1% of the CEF) to new alternative energy investments. TIMEFRAME: Begin research and evaluation in 2014.

3. Incorporate ESG factors into investment analysis and decision making: The Treasury Office will dedicate resources to better understand ESG factors (including environmental impact) and their bearing on investment performance. This effort will include, but is not limited to,

(a) discussions with peer institutions on their experience TIMEFRAME: 2013 and 2014

(b) canvasing the growing body of research focused on this area, TIMEFRAME: Begin process in 2014

(c) increasing awareness through participation in national forums (i.e., The Forum for Sustainable and Responsible Investment; the University Consortium on Investor Responsibility). TIMEFRAME: Join in 2014

4. Explore opportunities for shareholder advocacy on climate change: This might include, but is not limited to, (a) collaboration with other institutional investors on letter writing campaigns and shareholder proxies targeting fossil fuel companies, (b) leveraging efforts with national organizations where appropriate (i.e., the Carbon Disclosure Project; Ceres), and (c) directing portfolio managers to consider the impact of ESG factors on their portfolio investments. TIMEFRAME: Begin process in 2014 and increase participation in 2015


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Investment plan(s):

UW Treasury Office


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in other areas:

In 2015, Seattle City Light (SCL), a utility company, and UW agreed to collaborate, plan, develop, administer and implement a broad scope of renewable energy projects and programs. To support this effort, the UW will assign at least one (1) two-thirds full time staff person as a Renewable Energy Liaison with SCL. This position will communicate, promote and assist in the development of renewable energy projects and programs on the UW campus in collaboration with faculty, staff, students, the community, and SCL. The Renewable Energy Liaison shall coordinate renewable energy goals, plans, programs, and projects at the UW; liaison with SCL on program planning and project development; and provide regular reporting to UW program staff and to SCL. For more information about the partnership http://green.uw.edu/news/uw-and-seattle-city-light-create-green-program-partnership


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the other plan(s):

1. Provide campus event support to include renewable energy outreach and education during at least four (4) events. Coordinate and power events with SCL’s Mobile Solar Kiosk “MobE". Provide educational content / infographics on solar in Seattle, conservation, energy efficiency, key partnerships.
2. Create a website as a ‘portal’ for sustainability-related research at and/or sponsored by the UW.
3. Develop and document a UW renewable energy strategy in the context of the UW Climate Action Plan.
4. Assess, develop business models and report on the potential for a UW Community Solar program.
5. Produce 50 informational posters and create an online tutorial on how to produce a similar poster for similar settings.
6. Plan, develop, coordinate and propose at least four (4) renewable energy projects totaling at least 100 kW on campus.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the other plan(s):

UW Sustainability office, UW Facilities Services, Seattle City Light


The institution’s definition of sustainability:

The Sustainability in the Curriculum committee was charged by Provost Ana Mari Cauce to meet, analyze and report back regarding providing a more formalized and visible sustainability curriculum for undergraduate students at the UW.

The Committee discussed a variety of definitions of sustainability, and supports adopting a broad and inclusive definition. The Brundtland Commission report’s (1987) definition is one of the most commonly cited: “…sustainable development is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” A more recent (Griggs et al. 2013) conception identifies elements of sustainability related to thriving lives and livelihoods, sustainable food security, sustainable water security, universal clean energy, healthy and productive ecosystems, and governance for sustainable societies. We also discussed other definitions that included variations on the “3 pillars” of sustainability (environment, society, and economy), and the “triple bottom line” (planet, people, profit). We did not settle on one particular definition of sustainability, but agree that faculties, elected faculty councils and deans of academic units must decide what sustainability means to them (within a broad framework). Additional work is needed in order to develop a broad framework definition of sustainability (similar to the process that developed the diversity definition).

The complete report may be referenced here: http://f2.washington.edu/ess/sites/default/files/May 31 Final Report.pdf


Does the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document include sustainability at a high level?:
Yes

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

As part of the ongoing University 2y2d sustainable academic business planning, environmental sustainability is specifically noted as a key goal. Information about this planning is referenced here:
http://www.washington.edu/2y2d/plan/
http://www.washington.edu/2y2d/plan/campus-21st-century/


The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainability planning is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.