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The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 77.43
Liaison Claudia Frere-Anderson
Submission Date Oct. 14, 2015
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of Washington, Seattle
PA-3: Governance

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.00 / 3.00 Claudia Frere-Anderson
Director
UW Sustainability
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Do all enrolled students, regardless of type or status, have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies (through direct participation or the election of representatives)?:
Yes

A brief description of the mechanisms through which students have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies:

Students have multiple options for participating in governing bodies at UW:

The University of Washington Board of Regents is the University’s governing body whose broad responsibilities are to supervise, coordinate, manage and regulate the university, as provided by state statute. The Board of Regents consists of 10 members, one of whom is a student. Regents are appointed by the governor to serve six-year terms, with the exception of the student regent, who serves a one-year term.

The Associated Students of the University of Washington (ASUW) is a non-profit organization that serves as the student government at the University of Washington. The structure of the ASUW is a complex composition of 25 units, including entities, enterprises, commissions, programs, and committees. Operating with a budget of approximately one million dollars, 72 employees and over 500 volunteers work to serve students and improve student life.

The Graduate and Professional Student Senate (GPSS) is the official student government representing the 15,000 graduate and professional students at the University of Washington. GPSS exists to actively support and improve all aspects of graduate and professional student life. Over 150 elected or appointed students represent the graduate and professional degree granting schools, departments, and programs. GPSS grants two senators for each graduate and professional degree-granting department at the University of Washington. Senators are expected to attend two meetings per quarter and to represent their fellow students on an internal GPSS committee or a university committee. GPSS has four elected officers: a president, vice-president, treasurer, and secretary. They are supported by a staff of nine. GPSS has thirteen internal standing committees in addition to the full Senate through which it conducts its business: Executive, Judicial, Elections, Academic and Administrative Affairs, Community Affairs, Diversity, Student Life, Graduate Program Review, Finance and Budget, Social, State Legislative Steering, Federal Legislative Steering, and Communication and Outreach.

The Campus Sustainability Fund (CSF) Committee is comprised of multiple student positions, allowing full student control over the allocation of the Fund. The committee consists of seven student voting members and three ex-officio, non-voting advisors.


Is there at least one student representative on the institution’s governing body who was elected by peers or appointed by a representative student body or organization?:
Yes

A brief description of student representation on the governing body, including how the representatives are selected:

The student regent is appointed through the Governor of the state of Washington who selects the best candidate from a pool of candidates recommended by the ASUW and GPSS student governments.

Student government positions with ASUW and GPSS are elected by the student body through an open elections process.

Student positions for the Campus Sustainability Fund are elected by the student body through ASUW, GPSS and the Environmental Stewardship Committee.


Do students have a formal role in decision-making in regard to the following?:
Yes or No
Establishing organizational mission, vision, and/or goals No
Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives Yes
Strategic and long-term planning Yes
Existing or prospective physical resources Yes
Budgeting, staffing and financial planning Yes
Communications processes and transparency practices Yes
Prioritization of programs and projects No

A brief description of the formal student role in regard to each area indicated, including examples from the previous three years:

Financial planning & Strategic planning: At the January 9, 2014 Regents meeting the student regent voted with other regents to impose a limited waiver program to be used to strategically recruit non-resident graduate students, especially in Law, Medicine, and Business, where the yield rate has dropped.

New Programs: At the March 13, 2014 Regents meeting the student regent voted with other regents to approve the establishment of a master of science and doctor of philosophy in Molecular Engineering.

Communications: At the June 13, 2013 ASUW Board meeting students voted to hire a promotions coordinator for Rainy Dawg Radio.

Physical resources: In 2013 the CSF voted to grant money to the UW Solar team for installing solar panels on a new residence hall. The project was student funded and student led.


Do all staff, regardless of type or status, have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies (through direct participation or the election of representatives)?:
Yes

A brief description of the mechanisms through which all staff have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies:

Staff are appointed to various Faculty Council and Faculty Senate committees. University faculty councils are one of the three sites of shared governance at the University of Washington. These councils, which advise both the provost and the Senate Executive Committee, include:

Voting members of the university faculty
President’s designees
Associated Students of the University of Washington (ASUW)
Graduate and Professional Student Senate (GPSS)
Association of Librarians of the University of Washington (ALUW)
Professional Staff Organization (PSO)
University of Washington Retirement Association (UWRA)

Additionally staff govern the Professional Staff Organization's activities and decisions. The Professional Staff Organization (PSO) highlights the essential role of, enriches the experience of, and serves as a resource for professional staff at the University of Washington. PSO focuses on a variety of areas:

Advocacy — PSO advocates for the interests and benefits of the professional staff as a whole.

Communication — PSO promotes effective communication among professional staff and with the university community.

Education — PSO educates professional staff and the university community about issues that affect professional staff.

Professional Development — PSO provides scholarships and grants to support professional development.

Representation — PSO represents the myriad groups of professional staff through participation in university governance.


Is there at least one non-supervisory staff representative on the institution’s governing body who was elected by peers or appointed by a representative staff body or organization?:
Yes

A brief description of non-supervisory staff representation on the governing body, including how the representatives are selected:

Representatives of the PSO are selected to serve on various committees and Faculty Council and Senate appointments through an open vote of the PSO. Other staff appointments to the Faculty Senate are approved by the Faculty Senate.


Do non-supervisory staff have a formal role in decision-making in regard to the following? :
Yes or No
Establishing organizational mission, vision, and/or goals ---
Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives Yes
Strategic and long-term planning Yes
Existing or prospective physical resources ---
Budgeting, staffing and financial planning Yes
Communications processes and transparency practices Yes
Prioritization of programs and projects Yes

A brief description of the formal staff role in regard to each area indicated, including examples from the previous three years:

Programs: At the November 21, 2014 Faculty Council on Academic Standards meeting staff were included in the vote to implement restrictive changes to the graduation requirements for the Construction Management department.

Prioritization of Programs: At the December 12, 2013 Faculty Council on University Facilities and Services meeting staff were included in the vote to create a sub-committee on childcare

Staffing: At the January 29, 2015 Faculty Senate meeting staff were included in the vote to approve a resolution concerning equity, access and inclusion in hiring decisions and processes.

Communications: At the March 25, 2014 Faculty Senate meeting staff were included in the vote to approve updates to the UW Faculty Code.

Strategic planning: At the May 15, 2014 Faculty Senate meeting staff were included in the vote to approve the creation of a new faculty position "Professor of Practice".


Do all faculty, regardless of type or status, have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies (through direct participation or the election of representatives)?:
Yes

A brief description of the mechanisms through which all faculty (including adjunct faculty) have an avenue to participate in one or more governance bodies:

Faculty contribute to decisions and governance for the University of Washington through a variety of committees and governing bodies, primarily focused on the Faculty Senate and the Faculty Council. The Faculty Senate is the legislative arm of the faculty. It consists of 122 elected senators and is guided by the chair of the Faculty Senate and the Senate Executive Committee (SEC). The Senate Committee on Planning and Budgeting (SCPB) consults with the SEC and the Faculty Senate on matters of policy pertaining to long-range planning, preparation of budgets, and distribution of funds and the faculty legislative representative (FLR) represents the faculty in all matters of legislation in the state affecting the university. University faculty councils serve as deliberative and advisory bodies for all matters of university policy, and are primary forums for faculty and administrative interaction in determining that policy.


Is there at least one teaching or research faculty representative on the institution’s governing body who was elected by peers or appointed by a representative faculty body or organization?:
Yes

A brief description of faculty representation on the governing body, including how the representatives are selected:

Faculty Senate members are voted to office by their peer faculty who serve on the Faculty Senate.


Do faculty have a formal role in decision-making in regard to the following?:
Yes or No
Establishing organizational mission, vision, and/or goals Yes
Establishing new policies, programs, or initiatives Yes
Strategic and long-term planning Yes
Existing or prospective physical resources Yes
Budgeting, staffing and financial planning Yes
Communications processes and transparency practices Yes
Prioritization of programs and projects Yes

A brief description of the formal faculty role in regard to each area indicated, including examples from the previous three years:

Please see examples above pertaining to decisions made by the Faculty Senate and the Faculty Councils.


The website URL where information about the institution’s governance structure is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.