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The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 77.18
Liaison Claudia Frere-Anderson
Submission Date Oct. 12, 2018
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Washington, Seattle
OP-11: Sustainable Procurement

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.50 / 3.00 Claudia Christensen
Procurement Manager
Procurement Services
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have written policies, guidelines or directives that seek to support sustainable purchasing across commodity categories institution-wide?:
Yes

A copy of the policies, guidelines or directives:
---

The policies, guidelines or directives:

Presidential Executive Order No. 13. provides high-level policy and guidance for procurement of good and services, stating: The University of Washington will strive to be a model of environmental stewardship and sustainability by identifying and supporting efficient, cost-effective, sustainable practices in all its operations. These efforts will include reducing the University's use of energy, shifting to renewable energy sources, and decreasing its emission of greenhouse gases and other harmful materials. The University will reduce its consumption of materials, shift to renewably-produced materials, and increase the reuse, recycling, and composting of these materials, including food waste. The University will use the power of its research and teaching to develop solutions to environmental challenges and promote ecological knowledge and awareness. The University will be a leader in implementing best practices and will demonstrate flexibility in adapting to new information, changing approaches, and emerging technologies. The scope of these efforts will encompass all University operations, including: the planning, design, construction, and performance monitoring of facilities; user behaviors and activities in areas such as commuting, travel, land use, and information technology; and the overall cycle of procurement, consumption, and disposal of commodities.

The full Executive Order is available here:
http://www.washington.edu/admin/rules/policies/PO/EO13.html

The University is committed to environmental stewardship by maintaining purchasing practices that promote and encourage the use and purchase of environmentally and socially responsible products. UW Procurement manages a sustainable purchasing program and provided policies, guidelines, and other resources on their webpage:
https://finance.uw.edu/ps/resources/sustainable-green-purchasing

Procurement Services promotes environmentally preferred purchasing (EPP) as defined by the National Associate of Educational Procurement, meaning that environmental and social considerations are “taken with equal weight to the price, availability and performance criteria that colleges and universities use to make purchasing decisions.”

The University’s buying staff leverage current supplier relationships to raise awareness of the purchasing considerations necessary to reduce our environmental impact and to maximize resource efficiency.

POLICY AND GUIDELINES
In support of the University of Washington Policy on Environmental Stewardship and the American College & University Presidents Climate Commitment.

Procurement Services encourages the purchase of environmentally friendly products that are made with post‐consumer recycled content, recyclable, energy efficient, and/or bio‐based products. In our commitment to support the purchase and use of such products, sustainability requirements shall be included in all University‐wide contract solicitations. Suppliers will be required, upon request, to provide within a reasonable timeframe, information to enable a life cycle assessment, including material sources, extraction, fabrication and transportation to assess their impact on the environment.

In order to further the University’s commitment to sustainability, individual departments are encouraged to purchase recycled and environmentally preferable products, when quality, performance and price are comparable to alternatives.

Procurement Services encourages the purchase of environmentally friendly products that are made with post-consumer recycled content, recyclable, energy efficient, and/or bio-based products which are available through eProcurement and other suppliers.
In our commitment to support the purchase and use of such products, sustainability requirements shall be included in all university-wide contract solicitations. Depending on the commodity, requirements may include criteria for:

Energy efficiency, such as Energy Star and EPEAT ratings
Green Seal, Ecologo certified or other independent eco-labeling certifications
Low VOC and Greenguard indoor quality pollution certifications
Waste reduction
Trade-ins – supplier take back programs
Reclamation services
Reusable, refillable packaging
Recycled content, including EPA requirements
Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certification
Packing material reduction
Responsible delivery and transportation process and plan
Reduced paper use via e-Procurement or electronic payment vouchering
Certification that sweat shop labor not be used
Whenever possible purchase organic and local (in state) produce
Electronic and paperless processes and web-based catalogs
Credit requirements set forth by LEED (Leadership in Energy an Environmental Design) into product and service sourcing and procurement
Contract suppliers will be required to provide a corporate sustainability plan for publication on the University’s Procurement Services website and to provide annual reports of EPP products purchased against the contract
Products shall meet or exceed the efficiency standards identified in Chapter 19.260 RCW.
Bidders are required to submit proposals using recycled paper and doubled-sided copying to minimize waste.
Bidders will be required to complete a Green Profile questionnaire and report any citations for non compliance with environmental or safety issues.
Where environmentally preferable products and services do not exist, the University will work with suppliers to identify and develop opportunities.
Solicitations shall identify the minimum percent content of recycled materials in accordance to the current adopted USEPA standards: http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/products.htm
Product stewardship will be a factor when selecting products. The real or full costs of including life cycle or eco costs will be considered. See: http://epa.gov/epawaste/partnerships/stewardship/.basis.htm
Suppliers shall be required, upon request, to provide within a reasonable timeframe, information to enable a life cycle assessment, including material sources, extraction, fabrication and transportation to assess their impact on the environment.
See the Procurement Sustainable Purchasing Page at: https://finance.uw.edu/ps/resources/sustainable-green-purchasing

The University of Washington is committed to conducting its business affairs in a socially responsible, sustainable and ethical manner consistent with the University’s educational, research and service missions. Therefore, the University has adopted a Supplier Code of Conduct to ensure that goods and services provided to the University are produced in a manner consistent with these principles. This Supplier Code of Conduct is a statement of the University’s expectations and requirements with respect to suppliers. The Code is guidance for socially responsible business practices and describes the University’s expectations for supplier policies and actions regarding labor standards, human rights, sustainability, ethics, health and safety, and diversity.
Supplier responding to University solicitations are required to acknowledge and comply with the code.

See the full code here: http://finance.uw.edu/ps/sites/default/files/Code%20of%20Conduct%207-29-16.pdf

Supplier Diversity is a component of the University's commitment.The University is committed to Supplier Diversity by maintaining purchasing practices that promote and expand contracting opportunities for diverse suppliers.

The values of inclusion, equity and justice are central to the UW’s mission as a public university, and the fulfillment of those values is what the University’s Race & Equity Initiative seeks to achieve.

The passage of the Statement of Business Equity by the Board of Regents codifies these values in university policy, making it clear that business practices will be guided by a belief in inclusiveness and equity. The UW will actively engage with small, women-owned and minority-owned businesses to create opportunity and transparency, while supporting the broader economy of Washington.

Purchasing Services is the professional contracting and strategic sourcing arm of Procurement Services, a “procure-to-pay” (wing-to-wing) business service unit within UW Finance.

Procurement Services is committed to ensuring that minority-owned, women-owned, small, disadvantaged, HUB Zone, veteran-owned and service-disabled-veteran owned businesses have the maximum practicable opportunity to participate in purchasing and contracting at the University of Washington. We strive to increase the depth and diversity of our supplier pool by promoting fair and open access to the business community. Procurement Services is committed to supplier diversity because it provides the UW campus with a broad array of choice and diversity contributes to the expansion of the local marketplace and strengthens our supply base. In addition, when we diversify the University’s supplier portfolio, it increases our ability to secure better pricing, higher quality products and services through increased competitive bid participation.

Purchasing Services' buying staff functions with raised awareness of the purchasing considerations necessary to increase supplier diversity and to maximize contracting opportunities for diverse suppliers.

More information is available at:
https://finance.uw.edu/ps/supplier-diversity
https://bdp.uw.edu/


Does the institution employ Life Cycle Cost Analysis (LCCA) when evaluating energy- and water-using products and systems?:
Yes

Which of the following best describes the institution’s use of LCCA?:
Institution employs LCCA less comprehensively, e.g. for certain types of systems or projects and not others

A brief description of the LCCA policy and/or practices:

The University is committed to environmental stewardship by maintaining purchasing practices that promote and encourage the use and purchase of environmentally and socially responsible products. UW Procurement manages a sustainable purchasing program and provided policies, guidelines, and other resources on their webpage:
https://finance.uw.edu/ps/resources/sustainable-green-purchasingUniversity Purchasing Policy:
Product stewardship is a factor when selecting products. The University utilizes life cycle cost analysis (LCCA) for products where applicable. Suppliers are required, upon request, to provide within a reasonable timeframe, information to enable a life cycle assessment (LCCA) , including material sources, extraction, fabrication and transportation to assess their impact on the environment.
http://finance.uw.edu/ps/resources/sustainable-green-purchasing

State of Washington Legislative declaration 39.35B.020
The legislature declares that:
(1) It is the policy of the state to consider life-cycle costs (LCCA) in the selection of facility design alternatives, to the full extent practical, reasonable, and cost-effective;
(2) Life-cycle cost should be considered by the state government, school districts, and state universities and community colleges in the planning, design, and funding for new construction or major renovations; and
(3) Use of life-cycle cost should be encouraged for cities, counties, and other governmental districts including special purpose districts.

Intent:
(1) Expand the definition and use of "life-cycle cost" and "life-cycle cost analysis" to include consideration of all operating costs, as opposed to only energy-related costs as addressed by chapter 39.35 RCW;

(2) Encourage the recognition, development, and use of life-cycle cost concepts and procedures by both the executive and legislative branches in the state's design development and capital budgeting processes;

(3) Ensure the dissemination and use of a common and realistic discount rate by all state agencies in the calculation of the present value of future costs;

(4) Allow and encourage the executive branch to develop specific techniques and procedures for the state government and its agencies, and state universities and community colleges to implement this policy; and

(5) Encourage cities, counties, and other governmental districts including special purpose districts to adopt programs and procedures to implement this policy.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating chemically intensive products and services (e.g. building and facilities maintenance, cleaning and sanitizing, landscaping and grounds maintenance)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for chemically intensive products and services:

The University is committed to environmental stewardship by maintaining purchasing practices that promote and encourage the use and purchase of environmentally and socially responsible products. UW Procurement manages a sustainable purchasing program and provided policies, guidelines, and other resources on their webpage:
https://finance.uw.edu/ps/resources/sustainable-green-purchasing

The University has programs and procedures in place designed to protect the environment. The University's Environmental Health and Safety Department is responsible for developing university-wide chemical hazard communication policies, procedures and supporting information. EH&S maintains Material Safet Data Sheets (MSCS) and provide technical assistance when sourcing chemicals and hazardous items.

As a state agency, the University utilizes the State of Washington’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Reference Guide to evaluate products and services when developing solicitations and contracts, as well as when making coordinated purchases for the university. This includes multiple commodities, including building and landscaping maintenance and cleaning products.
https://des.wa.gov/sites/default/files/public/documents/ContractingPurchasing/EPP-Manual.pdf?=e2025

Specifically, the State of Washington’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Reference Guide lists dictates that state agencies avoid cleaners that:
-Have a flashpoint below 200°F (flammable)
-Contain SARA 313 Title III chemicals (known hazardous chemicals)
-Have a VOC level above 5 percent
-Contain chlorine, hypochlorite, or phosphates
-Contain petroleum-based components
-Contain unnecessary dyes or fragrances that may cause irritation
-Use aerosol propellants as they produce a finer mist that is easily inhaled by workers

The full State of Washington’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Reference Guide is available here:
https://des.wa.gov/sites/default/files/public/documents/ContractingPurchasing/EPP-Manual.pdf?=e2025

Additionally, as the recipient of federal funds, the UW follows guidelines established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The U.S. EPA Comprehensive Procurement Guide, issued for the purpose of implementing some requirements of Section 6002 of the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA) and Executive Order 13423. The guideline identifies more than sixty-one products designated in eight categories of products containing recycled materials, with particular emphasis on post-consumer recycled content. The designated products are:

-construction products
-landscaping products
-non-paper office products
-paper and paper products
-park and recreation products
-transportation products
-vehicular products


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating construction and renovation products (e.g. furnishings and building materials)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for construction and renovation products:

The University is committed to environmental stewardship by maintaining purchasing practices that promote and encourage the use and purchase of environmentally and socially responsible products. UW Procurement manages a sustainable purchasing program and provided policies, guidelines, and other resources on their webpage:
https://finance.uw.edu/ps/resources/sustainable-green-purchasing

In addition, the University has a number of design guides that address sustainability and energy related practices for grounds/landscaping/site work, buildings and environmental health.
Facilities Services Design Guide
https://facilities.uw.edu/catalog/fsdg
Landscaping and Site work
https://cpd.uw.edu/do/tours/campus-landscape-framework
Environmental Health and Safety Design Standards
http://www.ehs.washington.edu/system/files/resources/Lab-Safety-Design-Guide.pdf

As a state agency, the University utilizes the State of Washington’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Reference Guide to evaluate products and services when developing solicitations and contracts, as well as when making coordinated purchases for the university. This includes multiple commodities, including building and landscaping maintenance and cleaning products.
https://des.wa.gov/sites/default/files/public/documents/ContractingPurchasing/EPP-Manual.pdf?=e2025

Specifically, the State of Washington’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Reference Guide dictates that the commodities listed below must contain recycled content:
-Construction products: insulation, carpet, floor tile, cement, fiberboard, paint, roofing,
paperboard, blocks
-Landscaping products: lawn edging, garden hoses, mulch, fertilizer, compost, plastic lumber

The full State of Washington’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Reference Guide is available here:
https://des.wa.gov/sites/default/files/public/documents/ContractingPurchasing/EPP-Manual.pdf?=e2025

As a state agency, the UW is governed by Washington Administrative Code 478-324-010: which outlines procedures under the State Environmental Policy Act for products related to construction, maintenance, and renovation of buildings. (SEPA), RCW 43.21C.120 and SEPA rules, WAC 197-11-904 http://apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=478-324&full=true#478-324-010


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating Information technology (IT) products and services (e.g. computers, imaging equipment, mobile phones, data centers and cloud services)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for IT products and services:

The University is committed to environmental stewardship by maintaining purchasing practices that promote and encourage the use and purchase of environmentally and socially responsible products. UW Procurement manages a sustainable purchasing program and provided policies, guidelines, and other resources on their webpage:
https://finance.uw.edu/ps/resources/sustainable-green-purchasing

In support of the UW's efforts to meet its climate goals and objectives, no new server rooms or upgrades are to be designed into new or existing buildings on any of the campuses of the University of Washington. A server room is defined as a separate or shared space used to store, power, and operate computer servers and their associated components in support of business functions. Business functions are all of the activities that support the work of the University, whether academic, administrative, research, or clinical in nature. This policy applies to all university campuses, schools, colleges, and departments, including those in partnership with the University through affiliations, and third-party entities operating in university facilities. Campuses, schools, colleges, and departments are henceforth directed to work with the UW Information Technology (UW-IT) unit on solutions for meeting technology requirements. University policies, standards, guidelines, and procedures institute controls that are used to protect and operate university assets and resources efficiently and effectively. Additionally, all university contracts for desktops and laptops require the products be EPEAT certified and printers be Energy Star rated.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating food services (i.e. franchises, vending services, concessions, convenience stores)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for food services:

The University complies with the City of Seattle's Seattle's recycling, composting, and food packaging law (Seattle Municipal Code 21.36.086) which requires food service businesses - including food and beverage vendors at events - to use recyclable and compostable service ware instead of Styrofoam or plastic service ware that would need to be thrown in the garbage. The Event Recycling and composting flyer is provided with University contract caterers and is a condition of remaining a contract caterer for the University. The University's Housing and Food Service operations has been a leader in the utilization of compostable packaging and reusable mugs. They are compliant with this code.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating garments and linens?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for garments and linens:

The UW Trademark & Licensing (T&L) Code of Conduct establishes a policy and requirement that all licensees, such as those associated with athletic and fan apparel, must adhere to the Code of Conduct. Within the Code of Contact are specific requirements that licensees must disclose the name, location, and contact information for the factories it works with and that licensees are required to maintain membership in and meet the requirements of the Fair Labor Association (FLA). More on the T&L Code of Content and it's full content can be found at the link below:
https://www.washington.edu/trademarks/licensees/code-of-conduct/

In addition, The UW is committed to environmental stewardship by maintaining purchasing practices that promote and encourage the use and purchase of environmentally and socially responsible products. UW Procurement manages a sustainable purchasing program and provided policies, guidelines, and other resources on their webpage:
https://finance.uw.edu/ps/resources/sustainable-green-purchasing

In addition to the T&L Code of Conduct referred to above for licensees, all UW suppliers and vendors are required to agree to the UW Procurement Supplier Code of Conduct that provides guidance and requirements for socially responsible business practices and describes the UW's expectations for Supplier policies and actions regarding labor standards, human rights,
sustainability, ethics, health and safety and diversity. Given the size and contracting associated with these commodities, supplier agreement to the Code is considered particularly important. Specifically, the Code includes the following criteria for environmental sustainability:
1. Environmental sustainability will be considered when awarding contracts. The Supplier shall prioritize environmental sustainability practices throughout production, distribution, and disposition of the product, in accordance with Principles 7, 8, and 9 of the UN Global Compact.
2.The University may give preference to products and services that are produced, packaged, and delivered using materials and methods that have minimal harmful impact on the affected ecological systems.

The full Supplier Code of Conduct can be found here:
https://finance.uw.edu/ps/sites/default/files/Code%20of%20Conduct%207-29-16.pdf


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating professional services (e.g. architectural, engineering, public relations, financial)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for professional services:

The University is committed to environmental stewardship by maintaining purchasing practices that promote and encourage the use and purchase of environmentally and socially responsible products. UW Procurement manages a sustainable purchasing program and provided policies, guidelines, and other resources on their webpage:
https://finance.uw.edu/ps/resources/sustainable-green-purchasing

All UW suppliers and vendors are required to agree to the UW Supplier Code of Conduct that provides guidance and requirements for socially responsible business practices and describes the UW's expectations for Supplier policies and actions regarding labor standards, human rights,
sustainability, ethics, health and safety and diversity. Given the size and contracting associated with these commodities, supplier agreement to the Code is considered particularly important. Specifically, the Code includes the following criteria for environmental sustainability:
1. Environmental sustainability will be considered when awarding contracts. The Supplier shall prioritize environmental sustainability practices throughout production, distribution, and disposition of the product, in accordance with Principles 7, 8, and 9 of the UN Global Compact.
2.The University may give preference to products and services that are produced, packaged, and delivered using materials and methods that have minimal harmful impact on the affected ecological systems.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating transportation and fuels (e.g. travel, vehicles, delivery services, long haul transport, generator fuels, steam plants)?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for transportation and fuels:

The University's Climate Action Strategy for Transportation outlines the University's strategies to achieve carbon neutrality by 2050.
The plan is available at: https://facilities.uw.edu/transportation/files/reports/cast-020415.pdf

As a state agency, we are governed by Washington Administrative Code 478-324-010: which outlines procedures under the State Environmental Policy Act for products related to transportation and fuels. (SEPA), RCW 43.21C.120 and SEPA rules, WAC 197-11-904 http://apps.leg.wa.gov/WAC/default.aspx?cite=478-324&full=true#478-324-010

Specifically, the State of Washington’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Reference Guide includes the following regulation that governs the UW:
State law RCW 43.19.637, sets out the purchasing requirements for Clean-fuel vehicles. At least 30% of all new vehicles purchased by Washington state agencies shall be clean-fuel vehicles, and this percentage shall increase at the rate of 5% each year. It is preferable that dedicated clean-fuel vehicles be purchased; in the event that dedicated clean-fuel vehicles are not available or would not meet operation requirements, conventionally powered vehicles may be converted to clean-fuel or dual fuel use. The state has adopted the 2005 Federal Clean Car Act requiring certain vehicles to meet tougher emissions standards starting with the 2009 models. The Governor Executive Order no. 05-01, calls for agencies to take all reasonable actions to achieve a target of a 20% reduction in petroleum use by state vehicles by September 2009.

The full State of Washington’s Environmentally Preferable Purchasing Reference Guide is available here:
https://des.wa.gov/sites/default/files/public/documents/ContractingPurchasing/EPP-Manual.pdf?=e2025


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating wood and paper products?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for wood and paper products:

The University is committed to environmental stewardship by maintaining purchasing practices that promote and encourage the use and purchase of environmentally and socially responsible products. UW Procurement manages a sustainable purchasing program and provided policies, guidelines, and other resources on their webpage:
https://finance.uw.edu/ps/resources/sustainable-green-purchasing

State of Washington law requires the purchase of 100% PCR white bond copy paper, where feasible. In support of this requirement the University implemented a cross campus paper reduction committee and program. https://green.uw.edu/paper-reduction.

State of Washington law (RCW 43.19A) requires the use of recycled content products. The law’s goal is to substantially increase the procurement of recycled-content products by all local and state government agencies and public schools. The law provides a model to encourage a comparable commitment by Washington citizens and businesses in their purchasing practices. The law provides for a 10% purchasing preference for bid evaluation purposes.


Does the institution have published sustainability criteria to be applied when evaluating products and services in other commodity categories that the institution has determined to have significant sustainability impacts?:
Yes

A brief description of the published sustainability criteria for other commodity categories:

The University utilizes the EPA Comprehensive Procurement Guidelines at:
http://www.epa.gov/epawaste/conserve/tools/cpg/index.htm
as a guide when developing contracts. In addition, the state of Washington's Green Purchasing Opportunity Assessments is a tool utilized when making procurement decisions. The state of Washington, contracted with the Responsible Purchasing Network (RPN) to develop a series of procurement-focused opportunity assessments (OAs) to include information needed to appropriately weigh environmental considerations so as to achieve best value. the OA's considerations (including greenhouse gas emissions, presence of toxins, extended producer responsibility, and conservation of resources) the potential for a safer yet effective and competitively priced alternative, and potential for influencing the advancement of green goods and services in regional or national supply chains.
Architectural paint
Compostable serviceware
Green purchasing
Imaging equipment
Traffic paint


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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Presidential Executive Order No. 13. University Policy:
The University will reduce its consumption of materials, shift to renewably-produced materials, and increase the reuse, recycling, and composting of these materials, including food waste. The University will use the power of its research and teaching to develop solutions to environmental challenges and promote ecological knowledge and awareness. The University will be a leader in implementing best practices and will demonstrate flexibility in adapting to new information, changing approaches, and emerging technologies. The scope of these efforts will encompass all University operations, including: the planning, design, construction, and performance monitoring of facilities; user behaviors and activities in areas such as commuting, travel, land use, and information technology; and the overall cycle of procurement, consumption, and disposal of commodities. http://www.washington.edu/admin/rules/policies/PO/EO13.html

Procurement Service works with the local utility (Seattle City Light), contract suppliers and manufactures to identify energy saving equipment. Phase one focused on ultra-low freezer and as a result, Procurement Services and Seattle City Light executed an Energy Conservation Agreement in 2015 to provide a per unit rebate for a specific model of an -80 ultra-low freezer. Since 2015 the rebate program has expanded to include 25 ultra-low freezer models with rebates ranging from $700 per unit to $1,050 per unit, with an average annual yearly energy savings of 5,250 kWh, per unit. The current phase of our program is focusing on bio-safety cabinets, cryogenic freezers and other equipment utilized by our research community

Additional institutional guidance on other topics can be found at the links below:

University Administrative Policy Statements - Section 10 – Environment, Health, safety, & Security
---10.3 – requires WISHA compliance, which is a component of individual contracts: http://www.washington.edu/admin/rules/policies/APS/10.03.html

University Supplier Code of Conduct: https://finance.uw.edu/ps/sites/default/files/Resources/charts/Code%20of%20Conduct%207-29-16.pdf

The University of Washington is affiliated with both the Fair Labor Association (FLA) and the Worker Rights Consortium (WRC) to help ensure that products bearing University marks are not manufactured by companies utilizing abusive labor practices. The University, in connection with the IMG College Licensing (IMGCL), FLA, and WRC, has adopted Labor Code Standards that cover various issues, including wages and benefits, working hours, child labor, health and safety, and freedom of association. These standards are monitored and enforced at factories around the world by both the Fair Labor Association and Worker Rights Consortium. https://www.washington.edu/trademarks/licensees/code-of-conduct/

Chemical Hazard Communication (HazCom) provides information for vendors and contractors: https://www.ehs.washington.edu/system/files/resources/Contractors-HazCom-Focus-Sheet.pdf

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.