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  • AASHE-STARS

The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 67.42
Liaison Beverley Ayeni
Submission Date Oct. 6, 2014
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

Western University
OP-1: Greenhouse Gas Emissions

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 5.44 / 10.00 Stefanie De Adder
Sustainability Coordinator
Facilities Management
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution's GHG emissions inventory include all Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG emissions?:
Yes

Does the institution's GHG emissions inventory include all Scope 3 GHG emissions from any of the following categories?:
Yes or No
Business travel Yes
Commuting Yes
Purchased goods and services No
Capital goods No
Fuel- and energy-related activities not included in Scope 1 or Scope 2 Yes
Waste generated in operations Yes

Does the institution's GHG emissions inventory include Scope 3 emissions from other categories?:
Yes

A brief description of the methodology and/or tool used to complete the GHG emissions inventory:

The GHG values that have been reported in this section are based on the values reported to the Federal government for emissions. This value has been selected (as opposed to the provincially reported values) as it will allow for the most accurate comparisons with the emission values of other Canadian institutions.


Has the GHG emissions inventory been validated internally by personnel who are independent of the GHG accounting and reporting process and/or verified by an independent, external third party?:
Yes

A brief description of the internal and/or external verification process:

All Environment Canada and Ontario Ministry of the Environment reporting procedures have been followed for ensuring that all data is validated by a third party.


Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG emissions::
Performance Year Baseline Year
Scope 1 GHG emissions from stationary combustion 47,326 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent 53,889 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent
Scope 1 GHG emissions from other sources 0 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent 172.20 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent
Scope 2 GHG emissions from purchased electricity 29,166 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent 29,398.78 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent
Scope 2 GHG emissions from other sources 0 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent 0 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent

Figures needed to determine total carbon offsets::
Performance Year Baseline Year
Institution-catalyzed carbon offsets generated 0 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent 0 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent
Carbon sequestration due to land that the institution manages specifically for sequestration 0 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent 0 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent
Carbon storage from on-site composting 186.87 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent 0 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent
Third-party verified carbon offsets purchased 0 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent 0 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent

A brief description of the institution-catalyzed carbon offsets program:

n/a


A brief description of the carbon sequestration program and reporting protocol used:

Though Western has forested area, no formal GHG reduction/sequestration program has been established at this time.


A brief description of the composting and carbon storage program:

Though Western does have a composting program, it was not designed with the intention of servings as a carbon storage program.

Western collects organic waste at various eateries across campus and sends this to OrgaWorld in London where it is composted. Landscape waste is sent to TRY recycling.

Additionally, many offices engage in the "mini green bin" program, whereby they collect organic waste and empty it into compost cones located in gardens across campus. This waste is mixed at least once each year and turned into a soil amendment to be used on campus.


A brief description of the purchased carbon offsets, including third party verifier(s) and contract timeframes:

No carbon offsets were purchased for the baseline year or performance year.


Figures needed to determine “Weighted Campus Users”::
Performance Year Baseline Year
Number of residential students 6,161 5,575
Number of residential employees 858 810
Number of in-patient hospital beds 0 0
Full-time equivalent enrollment 29,050 27,410
Full-time equivalent of employees 6,308 6,000
Full-time equivalent of distance education students 875 822

Start and end dates of the performance year and baseline year (or three-year periods):
Start Date End Date
Performance Year Jan. 1, 2013 Dec. 31, 2013
Baseline Year Jan. 1, 2009 Dec. 31, 2009

A brief description of when and why the GHG emissions baseline was adopted:

The 2009 calandar year was used for Western's 2011 STARS submission as the performance year for GHG reporting. Therefore, it was selected as an appropriate baseline year for this report, Western's 2014 STARS report.


Gross floor area of building space, performance year:
8,254,478 Square Feet

Floor area of energy intensive building space, performance year:
Floor Area
Laboratory space 2,732,950 Square Feet
Healthcare space 465,016 Square Feet
Other energy intensive space 1,456,643 Square Feet

Scope 3 GHG emissions, performance year::
Emissions
Business travel 3,531.96 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent
Commuting 4,944.74 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent
Purchased goods and services 0 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent
Capital goods 0 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent
Fuel- and energy-related activities not included in Scope 1 or Scope 2 0 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent
Waste generated in operations 216.89 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent
Other categories (please specify below) 463.43 Metric Tons of CO2 Equivalent

A brief description of the sources included in Scope 3 GHG emissions from "other categories":

-Purchased Paper


A copy of the most recent GHG emissions inventory:
---

The website URL where the GHG emissions inventory is posted:
A brief description of the institution’s GHG emissions reduction initiatives, including efforts made during the previous three years:

Western continuously invests in energy efficiency measures. One example is increased insulation of our steam pipes, which has dramatically reduced energy demand and associated GHG emissions.

Other examples:

◾Building Automation Systems control heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in buildings and enable scheduled shutdown of air-handling units during unoccupied periods,
◾Major upgrade of systems and equipment in the South Power Plant in the past five years which included the replacement of chillers, boilers, pumps and air compressors,
◾Over the last five years , Western has completed major renovation projects on various old buildings,
◾Elimination of all domestic water cooling use in laboratory equipment, coolers and research equipment,
◾Yearly upgrades of the Building Automation Systems (BAS)
◾Western’s Environment System(WES) manages the BAS, monitors and controls HVAC, lighting, energy, soil temperature, rainwater and utility systems on Campus,
◾Daylight sensors and auto-dimming features to reduce indoor lighting,
◾Lighting across campus has been gradually retrofitted with a higher standard of energy efficiency,
◾Conversion to LED lighting for exterior and interior lighting in some areas,
◾Exit sign lights are being replaced with LEDs,
◾Replacement program for old Air Handling Units (AHUs), pumps and fan motors with high efficiency equipment,
◾Replacement of refrigerators in student apartments with Energy Star-rated units,
◾Replacement of furnaces in student apartments with high efficiency models.


The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.