Log In
  • AASHE-STARS

The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 51.34
Liaison Kat Pohlman
Submission Date April 26, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of North Carolina, Wilmington
OP-11: Biodiversity

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.00 / 2.00 Kathryn Pohlman
Sustainability Coordinator
EH&S
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution own or manage land that includes or is adjacent to legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance?:
Yes

A brief description of any legally protected areas, internationally recognized areas, priority sites for biodiversity, and/or regions of conservation importance on institution owned or managed land:

In the center of UNCW's campus is Bluethenthal Wildflower Preserve. In the fall of 1972, several of UNC Wilmington's biologists were concerned over the "progress" the university was making. New buildings, roads and parking lots necessary for the institution to grow had begun to invade its valuable natural areas. In their November 30, 1972, proposal, they state that "if encroachment on this last area is to be prevented, steps must be taken immediately to dedicate it as an inviolate preserve." They requested that the approximately ten acres surrounding the nature trail be dedicated as a wildflower preserve by the University's Board of Trustees and be "forever protected from all other uses." The Trustees supported this action and officially set aside the land in 1973.
Also, UNCW has 174.39 Acres of protected woods and wetland known as Ev-Henwood Nature Preserve. There are two self guided learning trails and the preserve is open to the public for nature walks and educational experiences.


Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify endangered and vulnerable species with habitats on institution-owned or –managed land?:
Yes

Has the institution conducted an assessment or assessments to identify environmentally sensitive areas on institution-owned or –managed land?:
Yes

The methodology(-ies) used to identify endangered and vulnerable species and/or environmentally sensitive areas and any ongoing assessment and monitoring mechanisms:

Methodologies that have been employed to assess and monitor species include Rapid Assessment Protocols. This approach is a hierarchical approach going from the broad landscape scale to field scale to detail of parts of the biological/physical/chemical scale. These methods allow for a more rapid inventory that may be followed by more detailed studies at the ecosystem to species level. Several rapid assessments have been done as part of UNCW classes. This has been used in wetland delineation as well and we have had the Land Management Group on campus demonstrating wetland delineation and subidividing of the campus natural areas using GIS. In addition there has been an Environmental Assessment of a portion of the campus for construction purposes to identify any issues with ecosystem loss/species loss.


A brief description of identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:

Eastern North Carolina, and UNCW is home to unique wetlands and therefore also unique species. For example, Bluethenthal Wildflower Preserve is home to the vulnerable Venus Fly Trap.
The North Carolina Coastal Land Trust works with landowners to conserve lands with scenic, recreational, historic and/or ecological value. This organization has land that overlaps with Ev-Henwood Nature Preserve.


A brief description of plans or programs in place to protect or positively affect identified species, habitats and/or environmentally sensitive areas:

The rotational burn plan for our forest has been set up since 2011. Prescribed burns are the best way to manage and improve the health of the fire-dependent longleaf pine/wiregrass ecosystem. Since the longleaf pine ecosystem is globally threatened this is very important. We have also started a program, mostly informal right now to remove invasive species and improve the health of our landscape with much reduced use of pesticides/herbicides.


The website URL where information about the institution’s biodiversity policies and programs(s) is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.