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  • AASHE-STARS

The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 65.19
Liaison Justin Mog
Submission Date Feb. 13, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of Louisville
PA-2: Sustainability Planning

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 4.00 / 4.00 Justin Mog
Assistant to the Provost for Sustainability Initiatives
Office of the Provost
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have current and formal plans to advance sustainability in the following areas? Do the plans include measurable objectives?:
Current and Formal Plans (Yes or No) Measurable Objectives (Yes or No)
Curriculum Yes Yes
Research (or other scholarship) Yes No
Campus Engagement No No
Public Engagement No No
Air and Climate Yes Yes
Buildings Yes Yes
Dining Services/Food Yes Yes
Energy Yes Yes
Grounds Yes Yes
Purchasing Yes Yes
Transportation Yes Yes
Waste Yes Yes
Water Yes Yes
Diversity and Affordability Yes Yes
Health, Wellbeing and Work Yes Yes
Investment No No
Other No No

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Curriculum:

The formally-adopted UofL Climate Action Plan, “Education, Research and Public Engagement to advance climate action” section includes the following goals with respect to advancing sustainability in Curriculum:
“Short Term Goals:
• Develop a faculty incentive grant program that would provide mini-grants for faculty who revise or enhance course curricula to incorporate practicum or other community-based learning opportunities for students pertaining to climate change and sustainability.
• Provide seed funds for faculty who engage in community-based participatory research focused on climate change and sustainability.
• Develop an academic community engagement course assistant award program that would fund and support graduate or undergraduate students course work in community focused on climate change and sustainability.
• Develop a University Community Academic Partnership Assistance program that would provide faculty with funds to advance university community partnerships necessary for student academic learning experiences tied to climate change and sustainability.
• Establish with the School of Arts and Sciences an undergraduate, interdisciplinary degree in Sustainability. Classes for the degree would be taught in multiple departments within the school.
• Create a USGBC student group with a focus on Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). The group would work with campus architects to conduct research and assist in promoting sustainable technologies in new and remodeled campus buildings. In collaboration with the Office of Planning, Design and Construction, service learning projects will be identified for student research projects. One of the goals of the group would be to create classes to prepare for student LEED certification.
• UofL’s Sustainability Council will work to increase academic collaboration on the topic of climate change. The Council will continue to invite speakers to campus for public lectures and forums.
Midterm Goals:
• The American College & University Presidents’ Climate Commitment calls for educating all students about climate change. The short-term goals call for increasing voluntary offerings, while building institutional capacity on climate change issues. Deliberation by faculty about making “climate neutrality and sustainability a part of the curriculum and other educational experiences for all students” should occur by 2020. In terms of undergraduate students, this would occur through the regular academic venues. There are many options for covering the basics of climate change and other environmental issues, including internships, service learning, international travel, and course work, all of which could include some practical activity designed to further sustainability on campus, in the surrounding community, or in the world. Faculty may also choose to incorporate examples, texts and theory about climate change into various majors and courses.”

In addition, planning through the Partnership for a Green City has generated a collaborative effort to create a sustainability education pipeline. Jefferson County Public Schools, Jefferson Community & Technical College and the University of Louisville are planning to create a pipeline of coursework from K – Graduate Degrees in sustainability. The university is in the process of hiring a program director for the MA/MS Interdisciplinary Sustainability degree (http://louisville.edu/upa/programs/master-of-interdisciplinary-studies-in-sustainability)
and when the BA/BS is approved, similar measures will be employed with a director of that program. Currently, outcomes are tracked by the School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies. SIGS tracks all graduate students through its PLAN program: http://louisville.edu/graduate/plan/

+ Date Revised: May 6, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Curriculum plan(s):

The University tracks 1. admissions, 2. retention, 3. graduation rate, and 4. job placement as outcomes.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Curriculum plan(s):

UofL Sustainability Council, Department of Urban & Public Affairs, and School of Interdisciplinary and Graduate Studies.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Research (or other scholarship):

Sustainability is a priority research and scholarship area identified in UofL’s new 21st Century University strategic plan. Research planning is under the direction of the Executive Vice President for Research & Innovation.

The UofL Sustainability Council’s Education & Research Committee has adopted a plan to relaunch the Sustainability Scholars Roundtable in 2016. The Roundtable is a venue that the Council piloted a few years ago to promote interdisciplinary collaboration among faculty and graduate students from across the university. It has four published goals: develop an awareness of sustainability research, develop networks of scholars to enhance collaboration through sharing of ideas; enhance research capacity & opportunity through interdisciplinary proposals; and improve and increase sustainability-related research at UofL.

The “Education, Research and Public Engagement to advance climate action” section of the formally-adopted UofL Climate Action Plan, includes the following with respect to advancing sustainability Research:
“In late 2008, UofL engineering and business alumnus Henry Conn and his wife, Rebecca, pledged more than $20 million to Speed School of Engineering to support the development of a renewable energy center at UofL, which had been developing several strengths necessary for building such a center. Specifically, the University and the Speed School had established the Institute for Advanced Materials and Renewable Energy and invested resources to build capabilities for advanced materials research toward renewable energy and energy efficient technologies. The Conn’s pledge allowed the University to refine their efforts toward a larger endeavor completely focused on advancing renewable energy and energy efficiency research for both Kentucky and the nation. This center, with a new and expanded mission, was thereafter named the “Conn Center for Renewable Energy Research” in Hank and Becky’s honor.

In early 2009, Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear announced that the state would enter into a memorandum of agreement with UofL for the Conn Center to carry out aspects of the mission of the state-created Center for Renewable Energy Research and Environmental Stewardship (CRERES). The Kentucky General Assembly created CRERES in 2008 through House Bill 2 to promote partnerships among Kentucky’s post-secondary education institutions, private industries, and non-profit organizations to actively pursue federal research and development resources that are dedicated to renewable energy. CRERES’ efforts are based on the seven-point energy plan issued in 2007 by the Governor’s Office of Energy Policy (now DEDI).

The Conn Center’s mission is to perform research and development on practical, economical, and potentially commercializable renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies and resources. UofL has the expertise to conduct research and develop technologies for solar energy conversion, energy storage, biofuels and biomass conversions, energy efficiency and conservation, and advanced energy materials. These explorations occur via the Conn Center in conjunction with UofL and other university faculty members as well as energy industry partners.”

+ Date Revised: May 6, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Research plan(s):

The “Education, Research and Public Engagement to advance climate action” section of the formally-adopted UofL Climate Action Plan, includes the following goals with respect to advancing sustainability Research:

Short Term:

• Provide seed funds for faculty who engage in community-based participatory research focused on climate change and sustainability.

Midterm:

• Academic research topics relevant to climate change mitigation and adaptation will be expanded above 2010 levels. This goal will be accelerated with additional external grant support.”

+ Date Revised: May 6, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Research plan(s):

There are 16 research centers under the Kentucky Institute for the Environment and Sustainable Development (KIESD) in addition to the Ann Braden Institute for Social Justice Research and the Muhammed Ali Institute for Peace and Justice.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Campus Engagement around sustainability:

n/a


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Campus Engagement plan:

n/a


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Campus Engagement plan(s):

n/a


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Public Engagement around sustainability:

n/a


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Public Engagement plan(s):

n/a


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Public Engagement plan(s):

n/a


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Air and Climate:

UofL Climate Action Plan - https://louisville.edu/sustainability/sustainability-council/climate-action-plan.html
In September 2010, the University formally adopted a Climate Action Plan that outlines a multifaceted strategy for UofL to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions down to net zero by 2050, with interim goals along the way. As a 2008 signatory of the American College & University President’s Climate Commitment, UofL has already made significant progress toward its goal of climate neutrality. Our January 2016 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory, documents our progress in reducing emissions by over 18.5% from 233,128 to 189,958 metric tons. This success for UofL is not without backsliding, however, and we must strive for continued reductions, as laid out in our Climate Action Plan.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Air and Climate plan(s):

Timeframe: 2010-2020
Goal for Reduction in net GHG emissions: 20%
Target maximum net GHG emissions (MT CO2e): 154,230

Timeframe: 2020-2030
Goal for Reduction in net GHG emissions: 40%
Target maximum net GHG emissions (MT CO2e): 115,673

Timeframe: 2030-2050
Goal for Reduction in net GHG emissions: 100%
Target maximum net GHG emissions (MT CO2e): 0

In addition, UofL's Climate Action Plan contains a goal of 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Air and Climate plan(s):

The Sustainability Council coordinates UofL's Climate Action Planning as well as the reporting of our greenhouse gas emissions. The Assistant to the Provost for Sustainability Initiatives and the Sustainability Council are responsible for planning and timelines associated with this commitment.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Buildings:

Campus Master Planning is done in University Planning, Design and Construction (UPDC) and there is a Master Plan for the Belknap Campus, Health Science Campus and the Shelbyhurst Campus. All new construction will be built to a minimum of LEED Silver standard LEED Standards will be used in building renovations. Brownfield redevelopment is also a goal of master planning. As of Spring 2015, the university and its affiliated partners have redeveloped 288 acres of Brownfields. University Athletics dedicated a LEED Silver Soccer Stadium in 2014, the university opened a LEED Gold Student Recreation Center in 2013; a LEED Silver Research & Innovation Building in 2014; and has five additional projects in different phases.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Buildings plan(s):

Measurable objectives include 5. square feet of LEED certified space, 6. acres of brownfields redeveloped and alternatives to single occupancy vehicles (in Transportation) to decrease the need for parking.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Buildings plan(s):

The accountable party is Ken Dietz, Director of University Planning, Design & Construction, and his department.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Dining Services/Food:

http://louisville.edu/sustainability/operations/food.html
Through the current contractual agreement with Sodexo for UofL Dining services, a minimum of 15% of all food purchased must be sourced from within 250 miles.

In late 2015, UofL issued a new Dining Services Request For Proposals (Deadline: Oct. 28, 2015. Contract Start: July 1, 2016) which included the following requirements with respect to advancing sustainability in dining services (contract negotiations are currently under way):
Priorities & Background (p. 7)
1. The University places high value on the practice of sourcing as much food as possible from local, environmentally sound, fair and humane sources. Food Service provider purchases should be Kentucky grown when available for similar price.
2. The University is committed to sustainability in all areas and expectation of the food service provider shall be the same.

Contractual Requirements (p. 13-15)
4.3 Locally Grown Products
When purchasing agricultural products, CONTRACTOR shall purchase Kentucky-grown agricultural products if the products are available and if the vendor can meet the applicable quality standards and pricing requirements.
CONTRACTOR agrees to work with their produce providers to achieve the University’s goal of using at least 20% locally grown products.
CONTRACTOR will provide quarterly reports showing the Kentucky-grown products purchased and other locally grown products purchased compared to the total purchases.
4.4 Support Programs
CONTRACTOR shall provide programs to educate the community about nutritional and wellness issues. CONTRACTOR shall provide programs for soliciting customer feedback and share the results of these programs with University management.
4.26 Maintenance and Utilities
CONTRACTOR shall be responsible for all operations, including but not limited to maintenance, repairs, replacement and janitorial services for all equipment, fixtures, and furnishings within the Facilities. All utilities, e.g., gas, water, electricity, etc., for the assigned Facilities will be paid by CONTRACTOR to the University. The CONTRACTOR shall use the University telephone system and data network and shall pay all connection fees and monthly phone/data charges as a cost of doing business.

4.34 Personnel
CONTRACTOR shall pay all salaries, wages, and employee benefits payable to or on behalf of CONTRACTOR employees. All employees (including student help) shall be employed by CONTRACTOR in its own name and at its own expenses. All CONTRACTOR personnel shall be subject to University regulation regarding personal behavior and use of the facilities. It is the CONTRACTOR's responsibility to provide adequate training for employees at all levels of the organization, including but not limited to: proper use of equipment; sanitation; and fire safety.

Mandatory Responses (p. 21-22)
5.4 Sustainability
The University is looking for a partner that has a commitment to sustainability and is innovative. As such, please answer the following:

A. Address your business’s commitment to sustainable practices as applicable to your business operation and services. Specifically state how your company addresses sustainability issues in food service for maximum environmental, social and economic impact. This should be accomplished by outlining how sustainability is incorporated into your business practices and products, as they relate to the purchase and transportation of food, recycled content, composting, use of green cleaning products, energy efficiency, reduced packaging, products recycling/disposal, waste diversion, and any applicable certifications related to the products or services you provide. This is an opportunity for your business to show its innovation around initiatives, programs and events.

B. The University places high value on the practice of sourcing as much food as possible from local, environmentally sound, fair and humane sources. Purchases should be Kentucky grown when available for similar price. Describe how you would work to meet this goal, and explain any potential barriers to meeting this demand (i.e. conflicting contractual obligations with distributors, etc.). Describe past efforts in local procurement including sourcing with multiple local vendors, especially farms.

C. The University would like to continue increasing its sustainable food purchasing. Explain how your business will work with the College to calculate the percentage of food that is sustainably purchased. The University currently uses AASHE STARS and is assessing other metrics like the Real Food Challenge.

D. Describe how you would regularly inform the campus of current vendors, including producers, processors and distributors, and provide accurate information on products purchased and total amounts spent each month.

E. Explain how you will participate in future campus based education efforts to promote awareness and understanding of sustainable agriculture, benefits of local foods, organics, and of “green” products and systems (i.e. recycling and composting).

5.5 Wellness

A. Describe the wellness oriented programs you would implement on campus including but not limited to nutrition awareness programs, weight management programs, flu/isolation meals, and any other programs that encourage good health.

B. Identify how you will assure that there are special diet accommodations including but not limited to gluten free, vegan, vegetarian, allergy free etc. in all dining facilities.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

As of Fall 2015, 30.2% of UofL Dining food purchases are locally sourced, many within 100 miles.
Vegan options are readily available to students, faculty and staff.
The University also hosts Farmers' Markets from May to October on both the main Belknap and downtown Health Science Campuses.
The University also maintains two different community gardens on the Belknap campus where students, faculty, staff, and community members can learn sustainable urban agricultural practices from rainwater capture to composting to companion planting to greenhouse management.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Dining Services/Food plan(s):

Dining Services are under the direction of Sr. VP for Finance & Administration (CFO/COO). The Sustainability Council's Local & Sustainable Foods Committee provides on-going oversight and plays an advisory role.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Energy:

In September 2010, the University formally adopted a Climate Action Plan that outlines a multifaceted strategy for UofL to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions down to net zero by 2050, with interim goals along the way. Increasing energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy are key components to this Plan. As a 2008 signatory of the American College & University President’s Climate Commitment, UofL has already made significant progress toward its goal of climate neutrality. Our January 2016 Greenhouse Gas Emissions Inventory, documents our progress in reducing emissions by over 18.5% from 233,128 to 189,958 metric tons. This success for UofL is not without backsliding, however, and we must strive for continued reductions, as laid out in our Climate Action Plan: http://louisville.edu/sustainability/sustainability-council/climate-action-plan.html

Also, in October 2009, UofL and Siemens Building Technologies Inc. began work on what now stands as a $50+ million, 13½-year performance contract to increase efficiency on Belknap Campus. In 2010, a second phase performance contract was agreed for the Health Sciences Center, Shelby campus, and a few more Belknap projects, involving another $23.8 million in retrofits. In June 2015, we launched a third phase to invest an additional $5.4M in improvements in lighting, heating, electrical systems, water conservation and other areas. On Feb. 5th, 2015, UofL trustees authorized spending up to $10 million more for the third phase, and while details of the project are not yet final, we have already identified $5.4 million in improvements which are expected to lead to another $457,600 in annual cost savings. Cardinal Sports Park, Ekstrom Library, J.B. Speed, Strickler, Shumaker, and Sackett halls on Belknap Campus will be among buildings receiving improvements, along with the Research Tower and Baxter I, Baxter II and Medical-Dental research buildings at HSC. Full details: http://louisville.edu/sustainability/operations/buildings-energy.html


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Energy plan(s):

UofL's strategic 2020 plan included the following goal:
(5.4c) Increase energy efficiency – reduce energy used per gross square foot
To be calculated by dividing the university’s total energy usage by the gross square feet of space (measured in kilowatt, BTU or gal. of water).

UofL's Climate Action Plan contains a goal of 20% of energy from renewable sources by 2020.

UofL's Energy Savings Performance Contract with Siemens Building Technologies Inc. spells out specific objectives, strategies, and timeframes for achieving guaranteed energy and water savings from over $50 million worth of efficiency retrofits over the 13½-year contract. The contract will directly save the university over $4.4 million every year and reduce our annual carbon dioxide emissions alone by over 46,000 tons (the equivalent of removing 7,690 cars from the road). With these improvements, UofL expects to reduce its utility bill by about $12,086 per day. These efforts have already produced documented results. In FY 2011-12, Belknap Campus reduced fuel use 48%, electricity use 27%, and water use 31%.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Energy plan(s):

The Assistant to the Provost for Sustainability Initiatives and the Sustainability Council are responsible for planning and timelines associated with the Climate Action Plan.

Siemens Building Technologies Inc. is accountable for the efficiency plans detailed in the performance contract.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Grounds:

UofL's Campus Tree Care Plan was first adopted on December 10, 2010 and revised in 2011 and 2012. The Plan has been instrumental in UofL being recognized as a Tree Campus USA, having met or exceeded all five of the standards required for designation every year since 2010. UofL has been recognized by the Arbor Day Foundation for excellence. Full details on our trees and other plans with respect to sustainable grounds management can be found here: http://louisville.edu/sustainability/operations/grounds.html


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Grounds plan(s):

UofL's Campus Tree Care Plan outlines our goal of caring for, protecting, and replacing campus trees with native species when trees die or become dangerous. Our 2015 Tree Campus USA recertification application included the following update on our measurable goals for 2015:
• No Net Loss of Trees: Throughout 2015, our Grounds maintenance crew worked valiantly to meet this goal, even without external grant funding and in the midst of numerous campus construction projects. We were successful in terms of not just maintaining, but expanding the total campus tree population (lost 11 trees and planted 50), and we were even able to maintain total tree biomass in 2015 (removed and replaced a total of 117" dbh).
• Mitigating Urban Heat Island Effect: In an effort to combat Louisville's particularly bad urban heat island effect, the University of Louisville seeks to target its tree plantings around parking lots & the west sides of buildings (e.g. the native Black Gum planted 10/20/15 SW of Miller Hall which will grow to 50' at maturity). We're also having to replace trees dying due to increased heat stress with more heat tolerant species (e.g. we replaced 3 dying 18" Locus from the SW corner of MITC, College of Business & President's parking lots).

In addition to our objectives with respect to trees, we have achieved the goal of converting all major lawn equipment to natural gas power to reduce emissions, noise, and gas spills. Each semester, students assist the Grounds crew with converting a new lawn area on campus to non-mow areas planted with low-maintenance perennials. A number of items are also included in our Green Purchasing Policy with respect to Grounds: drip irrigation, composting, and environmentally friendly ice melt are required.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Grounds plan(s):

Our Tree Campus USA program is coordinated by the University of Louisville Campus Tree Advisory Committee which formed in February 2010, and holds meetings, events, and service learning activities throughout the year. The mission of the Campus Tree Advisory Committee is to promote, enhance, and protect the urban forest on University of Louisville property. The committee seeks to engage students, faculty, staff and community members in pursuing this mission in line with the University of Louisville’s commitment to climate neutrality and sustainability.

The Grounds Shop is ultimately responsible for the grounds and resides under the Sr. VP for Finance & Administration (CFO/COO).


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Purchasing:

UofL has adopted a Green Purchasing Policy: https://sharepoint.louisville.edu/sites/policies/library/SitePages/Business%20Services/Green%20Purchasing.aspx
The policy details ten areas for purchasing requiring certain products that manifest in the measurable objectives.


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Purchasing plan(s):

Energy – All computers must be EPEAT and all energy using devices must be Energy Star certified.
All must also be recycled at the conclusion of their use. Energy efficient vehicles, interior and exterior lighting are also outlined for replacement.

Water – All devices that use water shall be water-efficient.

Toxins & Pollutants – Cleaning products are required to be Green Seal certified, Vacuum cleaners must be Green Label tested, mercury containing products are not purchased and pest control is done with environmentally friendly products.

Bio-Based Products – Biodegradable or compostable bags. Films, food and beverage containers, cutlery are requested to be used in RFPs and contracts. Bio-diesel or bio fuels are encouraged whenever practicable. Non wood paper and construction materials are encouraged wherever practicable.

Forest Conservation – All wood is required to be sustainably harvested and certified. Purchase of previously used or salvaged wood is encouraged when possible.

Recycling – 30% post-consumer waste recycled paper is required, single stream recycling is required, all computers and associated equipment shall be recycled, Toner, laser and Inkjet cartridges shall be recycled, concrete or asphalt shall include reground materials, and duplexing is the default setting on copiers.

Packaging – Reusable, recyclable or compostable packaging is preferred. Minimal packaging is preferred.

Green Buildings – New Construction and renovation must meet LEED Standards.

Landscaping – Must use recycled structures, drip irrigation, composting and use of compost, and use of permeable pavement is encouraged.

Food – Preference for locally grown Kentucky Proud foods. Minimal requirements for locally grown foods are set contractually.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Purchasing plan(s):

UofL's Green Purchasing Policy is the responsibility of the Purchasing Department under the Sr. VP for Finance & Administration (CFO/COO).


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Transportation:

The university was the first employer in Louisville to provide free rides on local bus service to faculty, staff and students with the UofL ID. In fall 2012, the university released a full suite of transportation alternatives including bus, biking, walking, car pooling, van pooling, car-sharing, flying less, and free campus shuttles. Details on all these strategies are available at: http://louisville.edu/sustainability/operations/transportation.html

In 2011, UofL's released its first Bicycle Master Plan. As a part of our campus master planning efforts, UofL has developed comprehensive plans for making our campuses more walkable and bike-friendly and we are working with Metro government and surrounding neighborhoods to improve linkages with citywide bike routes. Our Bicycle Master Plan provides guidance for facilities, signage, surface treatments, and pathways that are designed to encourage bicycling while enhancing the safety of bicyclists and pedestrians on all three of our campuses: http://louisville.edu/updc/master-planning/bicycle-master-plan

In 2010, UofL adopted a No Idling Policy for all vehicles owned by the University of Louisville or its affiliates or operated by any employee or contractor of the university during the course of their job duties at the university: http://sharepoint.louisville.edu/sites/policies/library/SitePages/Business%20Services/No%20Idling.aspx


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Transportation plan(s):

UofL's Bicycle Master Plan includes the following:
Goal 1: Create campus infrastructure where walking and bicycling is convenient, safe and preferred
Objective 1.1 Core Campus: Provide system of separated and shared-use walkways and bike paths.
Policy 1.1.1: Design campus core for the most vulnerable pedestrians and bicyclists
Policy 1.1.2: Separate bike and pedestrian lanes in campus core.
Policy 1.1.3: Provide secure intermodal and bike share depots
Policy 1.1.4: Signs, racks, unique surface treatments, and lighting shall clearly delineate user areas.
Policy 1.1.5: Meet LEED-ND bike design guidelines

Objective 1.2 Streets and Intersections: Improve Walk-ability and Bike-ability for Campus Commuters
Policy 1.2.1: Design for most vulnerable pedestrians and all skill levels of bicyclists
Policy 1.2.2: Designate "University Bike and Pedestrian District" Improvement Areas
Policy 1.2.3: Create Bike Boulevard from Belknap to HSC
Policy 1.2.4: No truck routes through campus
Policy 1.2.5: Partner with residential and business neighbors for Complete Streets
Policy 1.2.6: Create Educational Core Loop and Athletic Fields Loop as connected Mixed Use Trails
Policy 1.2.7: Plan for Mixed Use Trails on future development parcels and connect to existing Loops
Goal 2: Reduce Percentage of Single Occupant Vehicle Use to and around Campus
Objective 2.1 Transit: Support inter-modal commuting to Belknap, HSC, and Shelby.
Policy 2.1.1: Increase Bike Facilities
Policy 2.1.2: Belknap to HSC Shuttle
Policy 2.1.3: Pilot Program for U of L Suburban Intermodal Depots w/ Direct Campus Bus Routes

Objective 2.2 Transportation Demand Management
Policy 2.2.1: Bicycle Give Away Incentive Program to target S.O.V.’s w/ U of L Parking Permit
Policy 2.2.2: Bicycle Registration and Enforcement
Policy 2.2.3: Parking Permit Pricing to Support Reductions in S.O.V commutes
Policy 2.2.4: Carpool and Vanpool Incentives
Policy 2.2.5: Study VMT and SOV reduction strategies

Objective 2.3 Analyze and market U of L Transportation Sustainability Goals
Policy 2.3.1: Annually Collect, Analyze and Distribute U of L’s Alternative Transportation data
Policy 2.3.2: Market Sustainability Report Card (CSRC) and (STARS) indicators and Mayors’ GHG Climate Protection Agreement
Policy 2.3.3: Explore local green-recovery partnerships.
Goal 3: Improve Safety, Health and Environmental Knowledge of Commuters and Residents
Objective 3.1 Biking Programs for Students
Policy 3.1.1: Provide Bicycling Education, Extracurricular and Special Events for Students
Policy 3.1.2: Meet LEED-ND Programming items for campuses

Objective 3.3 Bicycling Programs for Employees
Policy 3.3.1: Get Healthy Now Bicycling
Policy 3.3.2: Provide On-campus employee bicycle fleets
Goal 4: Build Coalition to Grow Bike Share Program
Objective 4.1 Collaborate to Create Metro Bike Share Program
Policy 4.1.1: Bring Stakeholders Together
Policy 4.1.2 Provide University Financial and Human Resources
Policy 4.1.3: Lead Community Workshops and Focus Groups

Each year, the university’s award winning Earn-A-Bike program awards $400 bike shop vouchers to students, faculty, and staff who commit to not driving to campus and giving up their right to a UofL parking permit for at least two years: http://louisville.edu/sustainability/operations/earn-a-bike-program.html


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Transportation plan(s):

Transportation is accountable to the Sr. VP for Finance & Administration (CFO/COO). The Sustainability Council's Alternative Transportation Committee provides on-going oversight and plays an advisory role.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Waste:

In 2013, the university established a Solid Waste Reduction Committee that works on issues of reducing, reusing, recycling and composting materials that are often thrown away. By seeking ways to reduce waste first, including decreased packaging, use reusable items instead of disposables, recycle everything that can be recycled, and compost organics, UofL has made a significant dent in its garbage disposal while recycling is increasing. In 2014, UofL recycled over 4.6 million pounds of waste, which was 55.7% of the total waste stream. There is a Zero Waste Plan in the Sustainability Council Operations Committee approval process.
Details about our sustainable waste plans are at: http://louisville.edu/sustainability/operations/recycling.html


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Waste plan(s):

The charter of the Solid Waste Reduction Committee includes the following objectives:
• Promotion of recycling program--increasing awareness, understanding of program, individual prompts to increase recycling
• Changing University-wide culture to normalize recycling--behavioral change, institutional change
• Improving on current methods and discovering new opportunities to reuse items University-wide
• Goal setting--developing university-wide goals, matrices to measure progress, a reporting system, and feedback mechanism to the University community
• Custodial staff--training, development of policies regarding waste disposal (e.g. if a recycling bin has mixed waste and recyclables how should the bin be handled?), performance review standards
• Waste reduction--identification of specific waste streams that can be minimized or eliminated, modification in purchasing selected items (e.g. should we buy whitepaper without wrappers for each 500 sheets?)
• Recycling at special events--sports venues, conferences, catering, other large events
• Pre and post-consumer food waste composting

We have a goal of diverting >90% of the university waste by 2020. The university currently has a single stream recycling program, organics collection for composting (both on and off campus), electronic waste recycling, battery recycling, spent lamp/bulb recycling along with a Total Materials Management joint contract with the city that recycles construction & demolition waste, used tires, scrap metals and other items recyclable in the Louisville market. We have participated in Recyclemania for over 5 years achieving recognition each year. UofL also has move in and move out recycling events where “Trash Talkers” help direct people to recycling dumpsters, trash bins or the UofL Free Store.

In 2013, the UofL student organization GRASS (Group Recycling and Sustainable Solutions), teamed up with the Sustainability Council and Campus Housing to open the Free Store for the on-going free exchange of clean, durable items like clothing, shoes, electronics, small appliances, household items, bath & beauty supplies, books, school & art supplies, non-perishable food, and more. The store is run by volunteers and is open to all UofL students and employees set hours each week during the regular academic year. A surplus property exchange program also allows departments to send in surplus furniture so faculty and staff may swap furniture, equipment, electronics and supplies.


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Waste plan(s):

Oversight of the waste reduction and recycling programs is provided by Physical Plant under the direction the Sr. VP for Finance & Administration (CFO/COO).
GRASS has a faculty advisor and works closely with the Assistant to the Provost for Sustainability Initiatives.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Water:

The “Energy Conservation Policies” section of the formally-adopted UofL Climate Action Plan, includes the following goals with respect to advancing sustainability in Water:
“UofL has recently drafted and adopted a campus energy policy to set university-wide standards and expectations related to energy use. The policy states, ‘The University of Louisville, in an effort to establish and maintain practical thermal environments, appropriate illumination levels, sustainable energy consumption and environmentally compliant buildings and facilities, will endeavor to design and function in a manner to satisfy the requirements of the present while preserving resources for future generations. Consistent with this goal, the university will dedicate efforts to efficiently manage and reduce the consumption of energy, water and utility costs in a conduct that is responsible and consistent with providing an optimal campus community environment.’”

Formal plans for water conservation within buildings are developed through two primary mechanisms:
1. Water efficiency retrofit plans are developed on a university-wide basis through the Energy Savings Performance Contract that UofL has with Siemens. These plans call for the continued installation of low-flow fixtures, valve retrofits, and closed-loop bulk sterilizers to minimize water consumption in existing buildings.
2. All new construction and major renovation projects at UofL are designed and built in accordance with Kentucky's High Performance Building Standards, using the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System™ as a guide or for certification, depending on the scale of the project. Our plan is that, as a part of our commitment to LEED, all new buildings and major renovations will be constructed with efficient showers, faucets and toilets/urinals. Where appropriate, some new buildings will be designed to capture condensate and/or storm water for use in irrigation, as was done in the LEED Gold certified Student Recreation Center and the Clinical & Translational Research Building. Details on these building-based water efficiency plans are here: http://louisville.edu/sustainability/operations/buildings-energy.html

Beyond building-based water efficiency plans, Grounds and Athletics have also adopted plans for conservation measures when watering grounds and athletic fields. UofL seeks to minimize irrigation and water waste through a mix of high-tech and low-tech means. Details on water efficiency in Grounds are here: http://louisville.edu/sustainability/operations/grounds.html

Finally, UofL has developed extensive plans around stormwater management and flood control. In recent years some of these plans have been implemented. UofL made several changes to campus landscaping, parking lots and rooftops, with the help of $1.25 million in cost-sharing from the Metropolitan Sewer District (MSD). In 2015, MSD confirmed that UofL's projects are diverting about 72 million gallons of stormwater every year. We think that this significant investment will essentially pay for itself by helping prevent millions of dollars in future flood damage. We are also hoping the projects at UofL will serve as an example for similar projects across the city on both public and private property. MSD's investment in Belknap campus stormwater projects is part of an $850 million agreement that MSD made in federal court with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and state regulators in 2005 to reduce the incidence of combined sewer overflows into waterways during storm events. Details about our Stormwater efforts are available at: http://louisville.edu/sustainability/operations/stormwater.html

+ Date Revised: May 6, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Water plan(s):

UofL's Energy Savings Performance Contract with Siemens Building Technologies Inc. spells out specific objectives, strategies, and timeframes for achieving guaranteed energy and water savings from over $50 million worth of efficiency retrofits over the 13½-year contract. The contract will directly save the university over $4.4 million every year and reduce our annual carbon dioxide emissions alone by over 46,000 tons (the equivalent of removing 7,690 cars from the road). With these improvements, UofL expects to reduce its utility bill by about $12,086 per day. The stated goal in the performance contract is to reduce water consumption by 30%, and these efforts have already produced documented results. In FY 2011-12, Belknap Campus reduced water use 31%. Our plan is extend this progress to the Health Sciences Center as well, through retrofits that will meet or exceed the 30% water conservation goal.

With respect to irrigation water conservation, the first strategy is to plant primarily natives (or hardy non-natives) which do well in our local climate with minimal irrigation. We will then use soil probes and rain sensors to determine if irrigation is truly necessary. In some cases, where project funding allows, we plan to use smart automation of irrigation systems, as we piloted in 2009, by installing a "Rainbird SMT" smart controller at Thrust Theatre to control irrigation based on soil type, plant type, topography, and historical evaportranspiration & weather data for Louisville.

+ Date Revised: May 6, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Water plan(s):

Physical Plant is the lead on this under the direction of the Sr. VP for Finance & Administration (CFO/COO).

Siemens Building Technologies Inc. is accountable for the efficiency plans detailed in the performance contract.


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance Diversity and Affordability:

Diversity Planning Process
The development, implementation and outcomes of each unit plan are responsibilities of the administrative head of each respective CSD (College/School/Division). Each unit plan must be consistent with and/or build on the pertinent sections of the University’s Strategic Plan and the Council on Postsecondary Education state-wide diversity planning requirements. These requirements include measuring progress in the following areas: student diversity, student success, workforce diversity and campus climate.
Each unit plan must address the criteria outlined below—by appropriate unit “type.” Further, each criterion must be addressed by answering a series of questions—and each answer must include:
• clearly stated action steps;
• a clear delineation of responsibility and accountability;
• a time-table, expected outcomes; and
• an assessment plan that produces quantitative as well as qualitative data.
Each unit is assigned a diversity liaison through the Office of the Vice Provost for Diversity. Liaisons work with the unit diversity committees to provide advice and best practice information to assist the units in meeting their diversity goals.

Units submit an annual report to the Vice Provost indicating progress or challenges in meeting their unit goals. The reports are submitted to the Provost and she holds the vice presidents and deans responsible for the progress of their unit plans.

Because diversity is a key component of the university’s strategic plan and is built into the President’s scorecard, the President reports the results to the Board of Trustees.

Affordability – Cardinal Covenant
In 2007, the University of Louisville initiated a special program called the Cardinal Covenant in response to college costs and the challenge for students from low-income families to fund their education. The University of Louisville's Cardinal Covenant is the first program of its kind in the state of Kentucky. This program will make college attainable for the 22.6% of Kentucky families living at or below 150% of the federal poverty level as published by the U.S. Census Bureau (Data obtain from the U.S. Census Bureau).
http://louisville.edu/financialaid/cardinal-covenant

Diversity & Affordability - http://louisville.edu/sustainability/finance-outreach/diversity-affordability.html
UofL has consistently met its diversity goals over the past decade and has ranked #1 in the state on diversity achievement. There is a Diversity & Affordability Plan at the link above that resides in the office of the Vice Provost for Diversity & International Affairs. The University met 8 of 8 Kentucky Diversity Goals – the only university in the state to do so and achieved 95% of the Diversity goals in the University Diversity Plan (2013 and 2014).


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

- 4 percent African American faculty representation by academic year 2018-2019
- 2 percent administrators of color by 2018-2019
- 5 percent staff of color (all staff categories) by 2018-2019
- 20 percent undergraduate enrollment for students of color by 2018-2019
- 50 percent 6-year undergraduate graduation rate for students of color by 2018-2019
- 60 percent graduate and professional school graduation rate for students of color by 2018-19


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Diversity and Affordability plan(s):

1. President
2. Provost
3. Vice Provost for Diversity and International Affairs
4. Unit Diversity Committee Chairs
5. Commission on Diversity and Racial Equality
6. Commission on the Status of Women


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Health, Wellbeing and Work:

Employee Compensation:
In 2014, UofL adopted a formal Living Wage plan to raise the wage floor for our lowest paid workers. UofL became Kentucky’s first public university to implement a living wage when it increased its minimum wage for regular status staff employees from $8.67 to $10 per hour in November 2013. Provost Shirley Willihnganz then approved a proposal to increase UofL's minimum wage by 25 cents per hour per year for the next four years, starting July 2014 and continuing in 2015, 16, and 17 – bringing the rate to $11 per hour by July 2017. Living wage adjustments during 2013 represented a 15 percent salary increase for our lowest paid employees. As of July 2015, our lowest paid full-time employees receive wages of $10.50/hour, increasing 25 cents/year to $11/hour in July 2017. Details: http://uoflnews.com/post/uofltoday/uofl-to-continue-to-increase-living-wage-for-employees/
In December 2015, a new plan was adopted to extend the Living Wage policy to contract employees, as well. The policy mandated that companies doing business with the University of Louisville would be required to pay their full-time workers a living wage. UofL officials approved a requirement that companies entering contracts with the university must pay their full-time staff a minimum wage of at least $10.10 per hour. The plan is that companies currently doing business with the university will be required to meet the new guidelines when their agreements are renewed. Details: http://uoflnews.com/post/uofltoday/uofl-to-mandate-living-wage-for-contract-workers/

Wellness Program:
UofL’s plan for providing wellbeing services to all faculty and staff is known as the Get Healthy Now (GHN) program. GHN was launched in 2005 as an integral part of a comprehensive employee benefit package. It is a voluntary, incentive based program. Participating employees receive a $40 monthly premium incentive for participation ($480 annually). Additional incentives can be earned based on program-specific participation. The program is also open to spouses, qualifying adults, and retirees. The plan is to offer comprehensive well-being support through health and wellness classes, coaching, motivational programs, state-of-the-art fitness equipment, integrated clinical care and friendly, professional staff based out of the 22k square foot Get Healthy Now Wellness Center at Humana Gym. Advancing sustainability in health, wellbeing, and work, Get Healthy Now promotes wellbeing throughout the campus and broader community through coordinated, strategic interventions designed to mitigate top lifestyle drivers of cost (lack of physical activity, obesity, and stress). Details at: http://louisville.edu/gethealthynow
UofL’s plan for providing health and wellness services for all students is designed and implemented by the Health Promotion Office (HPO), which was established by UofL Campus Health Services in January 2007. Primarily informed by the Ecological Model of Health Promotion, HPO specializes in creative services and tools to support student well-being, engagement, resilience and critical thinking. The mission is to promote the vitality, health, academic excellence, and resilience of the University of Louisville campus community. HPO’s plan is to collaborate to build a campus community that values and exemplifies health by advocating increased access to healthy options; providing accurate and non-judgmental health programs and services; providing dynamic applied learning opportunities and peer mentorship; and applying critical thinking to problem-solving and health decisions.
Details at: https://louisville.edu/healthpromotion

Workplace Health & Safety:
UofL has adopted the following policy and plan with respect to Responsibilities for Laboratory Safety:
“The use of chemicals at the University of Louisville shall be planned and performed in a manner to ensure that a safe and healthy environment is maintained. The objective of this policy is to eliminate, or reduce to the lowest feasible level, employee exposures to chemicals used in University of Louisville laboratories. Recognizing the importance and widespread use of research involving many classes of chemicals, these guidelines will attempt to facilitate this objective by defining responsibilities and procedures for essential laboratory safety.” Specific strategies and responsibilities are laid out in these guidelines to achieve the goal of minimizing chemical exposure. Details: http://louisville.edu/dehs/ohs/lab-manual-general-safety

+ Date Revised: May 6, 2016

The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):

Employee Compensation:
UofL’s strategy for implementing its Living Wage policy involves increasing the minimum wage paid to full time UofL employees by 25 cents per hour per year for the next four years, starting July 2014 and continuing in 2015, 16, and 17 – bringing the rate to $11 per hour by July 2017. Details: http://uoflnews.com/post/uofltoday/uofl-to-continue-to-increase-living-wage-for-employees/
UofL’s plan to extend the Living Wage policy to contract employees, requires companies currently doing business with the university to meet the new guidelines when their agreements are renewed. The specific timeline for said renewals varies with the length of existing contracts. Details: http://uoflnews.com/post/uofltoday/uofl-to-mandate-living-wage-for-contract-workers/

Wellness Program:
The Get Healthy Now strategy utilizes a team of onsite professionals to provide enhancements to core UofL programs (Weight Management, Smoking Cessation, Stress Management, etc.), additional Health Improvement Programs and challenges, highlighting monthly awareness campaigns and events, and supplementary programming such as personal training, membership specials, health and fitness assessments, and more. Creative engagement strategies include tapping into multiple campus resources to engage individuals at all levels of wellness. Progress is measured by the annual increase in the membership and utilization of services, as tracked below:
2012: January – December 2012 Total employee memberships = 653
2013: January – December 2013 Total employee members = 1314
2014: January – December 2014 Total employee members = 1860
2015: January - December 2015 Total employee members = 2076
Percentage increase: 69%
Get Healthy Now has achieved the mandate given in 2005 to ‘build a sustainable program with measurable impact.’ This is evident in the year over year success in bending the curve of our healthcare trend and the numerous awards recognizing UofL’s workplace health promotion efforts. The goal overall goal is to save health care dollars by promoting preventative care. This “return on investment” in employee wellness is tracked annually. In 2012, for instance, Get Healthy Now’s documented ROI stood at $7 for every $1 spent. Details at: http://louisville.edu/gethealthynow
The strategies employed to offer health and wellness services to students at UofL include collaborating to build a campus community that values and exemplifies health by advocating increased access to healthy options; providing accurate and non-judgmental health programs and services; providing dynamic applied learning opportunities and peer mentorship; and applying critical thinking to problem-solving and health decisions. The resulting academic success of students, as measured by metrics such as student retention and graduation rates, is used as a proxy measure of the success of our student health, wellness and resiliency promotion efforts. Details at: https://louisville.edu/healthpromotion

Workplace Health & Safety:
The following strategies for minimizing chemical exposure are spelled out in UofL’s plan for Laboratory Safety as responsibilities of the Department of Environmental Health And Safety:
• “Assist the principal investigator in the selection of laboratory practices, engineering controls, and personal protective equipment.
• Provide technical guidance to personnel at all levels of responsibility on matters pertaining to laboratory safety.
• Review the laboratory safety web page as needed for updates and revisions, ensuring at least annual review of the model chemical hygiene plan.
• Provide basic laboratory safety/chemical hygiene training for University personnel.
• Perform periodic inspection of laboratories to assess compliance with laboratory safety policies and procedures.
• Work with University architects (Planning, Design, and Construction) and Physical Plant personnel in evaluating design parameters for laboratory facilities.
• Provide for the periodic testing of laboratory chemical hoods.
• Investigate all reported accidents that result in the injury or exposure of personnel or chemical release and recommending corrective action to reduce the potential for recurrence.
• Supervise decontamination operations where accidents have resulted in significant contamination of laboratory areas.
• Provide services for the routine disposal of hazardous substances.
• Recommend to the administration the means to meet government compliance with respect to hazardous materials; and
• Provide health and safety review of grant proposals involving the use of hazardous chemicals when required by University Committees or outside granting agencies.”
Details: http://louisville.edu/dehs/ohs/lab-manual-general-safety

+ Date Revised: May 6, 2016

Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Health, Wellbeing and Work plan(s):

1. Human Resources, directed by Jeanell Hughes (Employee Compensation, Employee Wellness);
2. Get Healthy Now, directed by Patricia Benson out of the Office of the Provost (Employee Wellness);
3. The Office of Health Promotion, directed by Karen Newton out of Campus Health Services (Student Wellness); and
4. The Department of Environmental Health And Safety, directed by Cheri Hildreth (Workplace Health & Safety).

+ Date Revised: May 6, 2016

A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in Investment:

n/a


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the Investment plan(s):

n/a


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the Investment plan(s):

n/a


A brief description of the plan(s) to advance sustainability in other areas:

n/a


The measurable objectives, strategies and timeframes included in the other plan(s):

n/a


Accountable parties, offices or departments for the other plan(s):

n/a


The institution’s definition of sustainability:

Sustainability is the quality of a system such that the system equitably meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. Sustainability requires the reconciliation of ecological, environmental, social and economic concerns.


Does the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document include sustainability at a high level?:
Yes

A brief description of how the institution’s strategic plan or equivalent guiding document addresses sustainability:

UofL's Strategic 2020 Plan (2008-2020):
“Expand our efficiency and sustainability initiatives to achieve the highest STARS rating from the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education.”


The website URL where information about the institution’s sustainability planning is available:

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.