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  • AASHE-STARS

The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 65.19
Liaison Justin Mog
Submission Date Feb. 13, 2016
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.0

University of Louisville
PA-8: Affordability and Access

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 3.08 / 4.00 Mordean Taylor-Archer
Vice Provost for Diversity and International Affairs
Office of the Executive Vice President and University Provost
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have policies and programs in place to make it accessible and affordable to low-income students?:
Yes

A brief description of any policies and programs to minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students:

Programs that minimize the cost of attendance for low-income students, scholarships for low-income students
Cardinal Covenant Program
In 2007, the University of Louisville initiated a special program called the Cardinal Covenant in response to college costs and the challenge for students from low-income families to fund their education. The University of Louisville's Cardinal Covenant is the first program of its kind in the state of Kentucky. This program will make college attainable for the 22.6% of Kentucky families living at or below 150% of the federal poverty level as published by the U.S. Census Bureau (Data obtain from the U.S. Census Bureau).
The University of Louisville will make a promise to incoming freshmen who meet the following criteria to award enough gift assistance from federal, state, private, and institutional sources to cover their direct costs (tuition, room, board, and books). Students will be able to graduate debt free as long as they graduate within four years and remain Pell Grant eligible each year.
http://louisville.edu/financialaid/cardinal-covenant
Porter Scholars Program
The Porter Scholarship program is the largest scholarship organization at the University of Louisville, designed to provide full tuition for African American students seeking an undergraduate degree. Named after a former university trustee, the late Woodford R. Porter Sr., the scholarship program was created in 1984. The mission and purpose are to provide academic, personal and professional support and to all recipients of this scholarship. Areas of support are based on the four pillars of promise which include scholarship, leadership, service and heritage.
http://louisville.edu/culturalcenter/retention/porter/porter
MLK Scholars Program
Administered by the Office for Admissions and the Honors Program, the Martin Luther King, Jr. Scholars participate in an engaging leadership development program while enrolled at the University of Louisville. This mentored scholar program includes a scholarship, which is awarded annually to ten Black/African American or Hispanic/Latino high school graduates from Kentucky or Southern Indiana. MLK Scholars participate in programming designed to develop critical thinking skills, engage in self exploration, and establish an appreciation for civic engagement. MLK Scholars live in an Honors Service Living Learning community throughout their first year, enroll in courses focused on social justice and peace studies, engage in experiential learning through community service initiatives, and, during the second year, participate in a service-based travel experience. The program includes full in-state tuition plus an educational allowance to cover other university expenses.
http://louisville.edu/admissions/aid/scholarships/mlk
Muhammad Ali Scholars
The Ali Scholars Program, offered to full-time undergraduate University of Louisville students, is a unique two-year experience combining training, research and service in the areas of violence prevention, social justice and peacemaking in an urban living context. A special emphasis is placed on understanding and addressing the social conditions that impact those issues.
Through their work with the Muhammad Ali Institute, Ali Scholars develop expertise on a topic of their choice by participating in seminars with renowned practitioners, educators and activists. The Ali Scholars employ a practical solution-based approach as they produce scholarly research related to their “expert area” and its impact locally and globally. Equipped with a solid knowledge base and organizing skills, the Ali Scholars provide service hosting on-campus events, furthering the work of the Ali Institute and working alongside campus, local, national and international practitioners in their expert areas. Through the Ali Scholars program, students acquire both the intellectual and practical training to take action and leadership on issues of peace, violence prevention and social justice at home and abroad.
http://louisville.edu/aliinstitute/the-ali-scholars


A brief description of any programs to equip the institution’s faculty and staff to better serve students from low-income backgrounds:

Inclusive Teaching Circles are small cohorts of faculty who meet monthly to discuss how teaching can be made more inclusive of students of all social identities. Typically, such meetings focus on a reading concerning research on oppression, pedagogy, or best practices. The outcomes include more effective and inclusive teaching practices and the development of a community of practitioners who come together to share their experiences and knowledge.


A brief description of any programs to prepare students from low-income backgrounds for higher education:

Programs that recruit and prepare students from low-income backgrounds for higher education:

Trio - TRIO Student Support Services (SSS) is funded by the U.S. Department of Education and the University of Louisville. UofL received funding for the SSS program in 2010, and was approved for renewal in 2015. The SSS program is committed to helping low-income, first-generation college students and students with disabilities achieve a bachelor’s degree. The program’s mission is to increase retention and graduation rates by offering academic, financial, and personal support.

During the academic year, SSS students receive individual and group advising to foster positive study habits and academic success. Students can take advantage of a comfortable learning environment, financial counseling, leadership opportunities, cultural excursions, and exciting academic workshops. There is no cost of participation for the student.
http://louisville.edu/trio

Upward Bound -- Upward Bound provides fundamental support to participants in their preparation for college entrance. The program provides opportunities for participants to succeed in their precollege performance and ultimately in their higher education pursuits. Upward Bound serves: high school students from low-income families; and high school students from families in which neither parent holds a bachelor's degree. The goal of Upward Bound is to increase the rate at which participants complete secondary education and enroll in and graduate from institutions of postsecondary education.
http://louisville.edu/uoflssop/upwardbound

Cardinal Covenant - In 2007, the University of Louisville initiated a special program called the Cardinal Covenant in response to college costs and the challenge for students from low-income families to fund their education. The University of Louisville's Cardinal Covenant is the first program of its kind in the state of Kentucky. This program will make college attainable for the 22.6% of Kentucky families living at or below 150% of the federal poverty level as published by the U.S. Census Bureau (Data obtain from the U.S. Census Bureau).
http://louisville.edu/financialaid/cardinal-covenant

The University of Louisville provides a variety of programs and services that, while not specifically targeted to low-income students, are available and attended by students and parents from low-income backgrounds. Examples include:

• Early Arrival Program - The Cultural Center Early Arrival Program (EAP) was created to help ease the transition of incoming students whom participate in the Cultural Center’s retention programs. This includes the African American Male Initiative (AAMI), Latino students and Woodford R. Porter Scholars. The day long program consists of an enriching series of discussions, events and networking activities about what it means to be an active and engaged student at the University of Louisville.

• O’YES! (Order Your Educational Steps) – a campus visit program designed for high school, community, & church groups. The O’YES group visit program allows teachers, counselors, youth program coordinators, and other group chaperones and mentors to bring students to campus for an interactive day of events. Group participants engage in conversation with USHR (Undergraduate Students Helping to Recruit) mentors through a student panel, enjoy a complimentary lunch on campus, and meet with Diversity Recruitment representatives for instant admissions and scholarship decisions.

• Cardinal OUTLook Day – a campus visit program designed for LGBT and allied high school students who are interested in the resources and programs available at U of L. The day includes a visit to the LGBT Center, a tour of LGBT-friendly offices and campus landmarks, an overview of academic offerings and study abroad opportunities, and dialogue with current students. The day includes concurrent sessions for the parents of LGBT high school students as well.

• Making the Connection – pre-orientation program designed to help beginning African American freshmen connect to each other, as well African American faculty, staff, and administrators. Students are given a special tour of the campus with emphasis placed on student service and multicultural “hot spots.” Ice-breakers, food, and cultural entertainment are provided to help students to make the transition to college prior to the beginning of fall classes.

• USHR (Undergraduate Students Helping to Recruit) – The USHR Mentoring Program is a two- part program that focuses on the retention of current students while serving as a mentoring organization for prospective African American students. Through USHR, current UofL students are paired with prospective senior high school students in order to assist them in their exploration of educational and leadership opportunities at the University of Louisville.

• Undergraduate Summer Program in Cardiovascular Research for students from Under-Represented or Under-Served Populations - The primary objective of this program is to expose undergraduate students from under-represented and under-served populations to cardiovascular research at the University of Louisville. The program is supported by a NIH Short-Term Training Grant from the National Heart Blood and Lung Institute.

• REACH (Resources for Academic Exchange) – provides academic services and specific support programs to enable students to better prepare and adapt to college life and to enhance their academic skills and performance in college courses.
• Signature Partnership Initiative (SPI) - The Signature Partnership Initiative is a university effort to enhance the quality of life and economic opportunity for residents of West Louisville. By working with various community partners, the goal is to improve the educational, health, economic and social status of individuals and families who live in our urban core. With regard to education, the program objectives are to
o Raise reading, math, and science skills to grade level
o Raise percentage of residents with a high school diploma to that of the community average
o Raise percentage of residents with a bachelor's degree to that of the community average
U of L faculty, staff, and students team up with other community partners to work with teachers and parents of students in the target area schools. As a result of these and other community engagement initiatives, the Corporation for National and Community Service named UofL to the honor roll for its volunteerism, community-based learning and community engagement programs.


A brief description of the institution's scholarships for low-income students:

In 2007, the University of Louisville initiated a special program called the Cardinal Covenant in response to college costs and the challenge for students from low-income families to fund their education. The University of Louisville's Cardinal Covenant is the first program of its kind in the state of Kentucky. This program will make college attainable for the 22.6% of Kentucky families living at or below 150% of the federal poverty level as published by the U.S. Census Bureau (Data obtain from the U.S. Census Bureau).
http://louisville.edu/financialaid/cardinal-covenant


A brief description of any programs to guide parents of low-income students through the higher education experience:

The University's recruitment and outreach programs include workshops facilitated by Financial Aid counselors to work with students and parents to highlight funding opportunities for low-income families. These programs include information about Pell grant eligibility, Cardinal Covenant, the importance of adhering to deadlines and funding sources within the university, the state, and federal funding.


A brief description of any targeted outreach to recruit students from low-income backgrounds:

The University of Louisville provides a variety of programs and services that, while not specifically targeted to low-income students, are available and attended by students and parents from low-income backgrounds. Examples include:

• Early Arrival Program - The Cultural Center Early Arrival Program (EAP) was created to help ease the transition of incoming students whom participate in the Cultural Center’s retention programs. This includes the African American Male Initiative (AAMI), Latino students and Woodford R. Porter Scholars. The day long program consists of an enriching series of discussions, events and networking activities about what it means to be an active and engaged student at the University of Louisville.

• O’YES! (Order Your Educational Steps) – a campus visit program designed for high school, community, & church groups. The O’YES group visit program allows teachers, counselors, youth program coordinators, and other group chaperones and mentors to bring students to campus for an interactive day of events. Group participants engage in conversation with USHR (Undergraduate Students Helping to Recruit) mentors through a student panel, enjoy a complimentary lunch on campus, and meet with Diversity Recruitment representatives for instant admissions and scholarship decisions.

• Cardinal OUTLook Day – a campus visit program designed for LGBT and allied high school students who are interested in the resources and programs available at U of L. The day includes a visit to the LGBT Center, a tour of LGBT-friendly offices and campus landmarks, an overview of academic offerings and study abroad opportunities, and dialogue with current students. The day includes concurrent sessions for the parents of LGBT high school students as well.

• Making the Connection – pre-orientation program designed to help beginning African American freshmen connect to each other, as well African American faculty, staff, and administrators. Students are given a special tour of the campus with emphasis placed on student service and multicultural “hot spots.” Ice-breakers, food, and cultural entertainment are provided to help students to make the transition to college prior to the beginning of fall classes.

• USHR (Undergraduate Students Helping to Recruit) – The USHR Mentoring Program is a two- part program that focuses on the retention of current students while serving as a mentoring organization for prospective African American students. Through USHR, current UofL students are paired with prospective senior high school students in order to assist them in their exploration of educational and leadership opportunities at the University of Louisville.

• Undergraduate Summer Program in Cardiovascular Research for students from Under-Represented or Under-Served Populations - The primary objective of this program is to expose undergraduate students from under-represented and under-served populations to cardiovascular research at the University of Louisville. The program is supported by a NIH Short-Term Training Grant from the National Heart Blood and Lung Institute.

• REACH (Resources for Academic Exchange) – provides academic services and specific support programs to enable students to better prepare and adapt to college life and to enhance their academic skills and performance in college courses.
• Signature Partnership Initiative (SPI) - The Signature Partnership Initiative is a university effort to enhance the quality of life and economic opportunity for residents of West Louisville. By working with various community partners, the goal is to improve the educational, health, economic and social status of individuals and families who live in our urban core. With regard to education, the program objectives are to
o Raise reading, math, and science skills to grade level
o Raise percentage of residents with a high school diploma to that of the community average
o Raise percentage of residents with a bachelor's degree to that of the community average
U of L faculty, staff, and students team up with other community partners to work with teachers and parents of students in the target area schools. As a result of these and other community engagement initiatives, the Corporation for National and Community Service named UofL to the honor roll for its volunteerism, community-based learning and community engagement programs.


A brief description of other admissions policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:
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A brief description of other financial aid policies or programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students:
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A brief description of other policies and programs to make the institution accessible and affordable to low-income students not covered above:
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Does the institution have policies and programs in place to support non-traditional students?:
Yes

A brief description of any scholarships provided specifically for part-time students:

UofL recognizes the importance of making degree attainment accessible for non-traditional and part time students. Funding is available through the Financial Aid Office the same as for traditional, full-time students, in addition to special funding opportunities for adult learners. Students who are transferring to the University of Louisville directly from a Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS) institution or Ivy Tech Community College, Sellersburg may be eligible to apply for the KCTCS Academic Transfer Scholarship.
The Benard Osher Reentry Scholarship was established at the University of Louisville to assist eligible adult college students in the completion of their first Bachelor's degree.
The New Beginning Scholarship fund is awarded to non-traditional Kentucky residents pursuing an undergraduate degree at the University of Louisville.
The Office of Transfer and Adult Services provides resources specifically targeted to meet the needs of adult learners, returning students, and students attending part-time. More information can be found here: http://louisville.edu/admissions/apply/transfer
The Bachelor of Science in Organizational Leadership and Learning (OLL), formerly Workforce Leadership, is designed for working professionals who have at least five years of work experience.
This program is a great option for adults seeking an extra edge in today's job market. Classes are offered online, or in convenient off-campus locations, Monday through Thursday evenings in Louisville, and at Fort Knox.


A brief description of any onsite child care facilities, partnerships with local facilities, and/or subsidies or financial support to help meet the child care needs of students:

Family Scholar House
Family Scholar House began as Project Women in 1995 to confront the needs of women and children in crisis in Louisville. The recognized the power of education to change lives and developed an educational program to assist single-mothers earn college degrees. Project Women continued to serve a small number of women each year until 2005 when Cathe Dykstra, Family Scholar House's CEO and Chief Possibility Officer, joined the program. Dykstra increased the programs growth by expanding outreach efforts to single-parents and in 2008, Project Women changed its name to Family Scholar House. With the name change, Family Scholar House expanded its services to meet the needs of single-parents and their children to ensure that the entire family succeeds in education. Since 2008, Family Scholar House has seen a significant increase in the number of single parents seeking assistance. As of January 2015, 379 families with 572 children have utilized the Family Scholar House residential program. There are currently 939 families with 1,548 children on the pre-residential housing waiting list. To date, Family Scholar House participants have earned a total of 241 college degrees.
http://familyscholarhouse.org/

Early Learning Campus
The Early Learning Campus (ELC) is part of the Gladys and Lewis "Sonny" Bass Louisville Scholar House Campus and is an exemplary early child development center for children of UofL faculty, staff and students, and residents of the Louisville Scholar House. The facility is accredited by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and offers full day curriculum for children aged six weeks to four years, (children who will turn four by October 1). http://louisville.edu/education/elc


A brief description of other policies and programs to support non-traditional students:
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Does the institution wish to pursue Part 2 of this credit (accessibility and affordability indicators)?:
Yes

Indicators that the institution is accessible and affordable to low-income students::
Percentage (0-100)
The percentage of entering students that are low-income 37.60
The graduation/success rate for low-income students 47.50
The percentage of student financial need met, on average 79.50
The percentage of students graduating with no interest-bearing student loan debt 43

The percentage of students that participate in or directly benefit from the institution’s policies and programs to support low-income and non-traditional students:
33

The website URL where information about the institution's affordability and access programs is available:

The percentage of student financial need met, on average, is based on tuition need only, and not related expenses.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.