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The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Gold
Overall Score 81.30
Liaison Sarah Munro
Submission Date June 30, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

University of Connecticut
PA-3: Participatory Governance

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 2.75 / 3.00 Sarah Munro
Sustainability Coordinator
Office of Environmental Policy
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Do the institution’s students have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a student council)? :
Yes

Do the institution’s students have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body?:
Yes

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which students are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

There are two student representatives elected to the University Board of Trustees, which “determines the general policy of the University, including the establishment of new schools and colleges; makes laws for its government; manages its investments; and directs the expenditure of funds.” These two members are elected by both alumni and current students.

There are also five student representatives in the University Senate, appointed by the Student Government. The University Senate is “a legislative body for the purpose of establishing minimum rules and general regulations pertaining to all undergraduate schools and colleges and with policy insofar as it pertains in a general way to the educational program of the institution and is not reserved to the Board of Trustees, to the administration, to the Graduate Faculty Council, or to the several faculties.

An undergraduate student government has existed at the University of Connecticut in Storrs in various forms and under different names since 1894. Originally, it was composed of nine elected students who worked with the faculty “upon matters of government of the college.” By 1913, the organization was called the Student Organization, and its members were the two hundred thirty-nine students enrolled at Connecticut Agricultural College.

In 1921, the government was reorganized and a standing committee called the Student Senate was formed as the executive branch. The Senate adopted a constitution and became known as the Associated Student Government (ASG). The constitution outlined the duties of the executive, legislative, and judicial branches of the ASG, which was modeled after the federal government. The Student Senate continued as the core of student political power until 1973 when the ASG dissolved. In the following academic year, the ASG was replaced by the Federation of Students and Service Organizations (FSSO). The Senate was replaced by a Central Committee.

In 1980, the FSSO was replaced by the Undergraduate Student Government (USG), and the Student Assembly became the representative student body. The Undergraduate Student Government bodies have piloted (and funded) the launch of every other major student organization on campus including: The Daily Campus, WHUS, SUBOG, IFC, and RHA. Members of USG are elected by their peers through campaigning.

USG is recognized by the University Of Connecticut Board Of Trustees as one of the five governing bodies on campus (along with the Board of Trustees, and the Graduate Student Senate). USG is the primary voice of students to all audiences, and actively partakes in the university-wide decision making process through representation and advocacy. (http://usg.uconn.edu/about/)

The Graduate Student Senate represents the Graduate community within the University community. They serve as an advocate of the Graduate community’s concerns and needs to both University and non-University organizations. In addition, they also, serve as a liaison between the Graduate community and the University administration. They provide services to meet the special needs of the University’s diverse Graduate community, and enhance and encourage cooperation and association within the Graduate community. Their goal is to enrich the lives of the Graduate students at the University.
(http://gss.uconn.edu/)


Do the institution’s staff members have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a staff council)?:
Yes

Do the institution’s non-supervisory staff members have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body?:
No

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which staff are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

In conjunction with the University Board of Trustees, UConn has a University Senate, comprised of 91 members.

The University Senate is a legislative body responsible for establishing minimum rules and general regulations of the educational program and mission of the institution. The University Senate shall be regularly consulted by the Administration on matters pertaining to the Senate's purview.

A breakdown of University Senate membership includes 3 deans of the schools and colleges, 72 faculty positions, 9 professional staff positions, 5 undergraduate students, and two graduate students. These positions are elected each May, per the University Senate by-laws. Ex officio members include the President, the Provost, all Vice Presidents, and all Vice Provosts.

"In October of each year the Nominating Committee shall submit to the faculty and to the professional staff slates composed of at least two nominees for each At-large seat to be filled in the Senate. Candidates may also be nominated by petition; if a petition signed by five members of the faculty or the professional staff in support of a candidate is submitted before 1 November, that candidate's name shall be included on the election ballot. The Senate, annually at its May meeting, shall determine the number of members of each standing committee for the ensuing year, shall elect the members of such committees, and shall designate the chairman of each such committee. Before such elections, nominations for committee members and chairmen, in addition to those submitted by the Senate Nominating Committee, may be made from the floor. If there are more nominees for any committee than the number of places to be filled or if there is more than one nomination for the chairmanship of any committee, the election of that committee or of that committee chairman shall take place by secret ballot. The newly elected committees and their chairmen shall take office on July 1 following their election."

For a comprehensive view of the functions of the University Senate, please refer to the following webpage: http://senate.uconn.edu/

The University Senate by-laws can be read here: http://policy.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/243/2017/05/bylaws.20170501.final_.pdf


Do the institution’s teaching and research faculty have a representative body through which they can participate in governance (e.g. a faculty senate)?:
Yes

Do the institution’s teaching and research faculty have an elected representative on the institution’s highest governing body? :
Yes

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which teaching and research faculty are engaged in governance, including information to support each affirmative response above:

Faculty are elected and appointed to the Board of Trustees by their peers in the University Senate. They serve as active members of the board.

In conjunction with the University Board of Trustees, UConn also has a University Senate, comprised of 91 members.

By the University by-laws, certain elected members of the University Senate shall be appointed as ex-officio faculty member representatives on the Board of Trustees, with full participation in discussion but without vote. These representatives will have the same status at Board of Trustees meetings, with voice but without vote. When executive sessions are called only those persons whose presence is necessary to provide their opinion on the issue at hand will be invited into Executive Session.

The faculty members that hold positions on the Board of Trustees contribute vital information that they possess because of their position as a faculty member, that other Board of Trustee members would not necessarily know. It is for this reason that having ex-officio faculty members on the Board of Trustees is essential.

Faculty members also serve on specific committees within the Board of Trustees. For example, the additional members to the Honors and Awards committee include the Provost and Executive Vice President, Executive Vice President for Health Affairs, three faculty members, two students, and Foundation President.

The University Senate is a legislative body responsible for establishing minimum rules and general regulations of the educational program and mission of the institution. The University Senate shall be regularly consulted by the Administration on matters pertaining to the Senate's purview.

A breakdown of University Senate membership includes 3 deans of the schools and colleges, 72 faculty positions, 9 professional staff positions, 5 undergraduate students, and two graduate students. These positions are elected each May, per the University Senate by-laws. Ex officio members include the President, the Provost, all Vice Presidents, and all Vice Provosts.

"In October of each year the Nominating Committee shall submit to the faculty and to the professional staff slates composed of at least two nominees for each At-large seat to be filled in the Senate. Candidates may also be nominated by petition; if a petition
signed by five members of the faculty or the professional staff in support of a candidate is submitted before 1 November, that candidate's name shall be included on the election ballot. The Senate, annually at its May meeting, shall determine the number of members of each standing committee for the ensuing year, shall elect the members of such committees, and shall designate the chairman of each such committee. Before such elections, nominations for committee members and chairmen, in addition to those submitted by the Senate Nominating Committee, may be made from the floor. If there are more nominees for any committee than the number of places to be filled or if there is more than one nomination for the chairmanship of any committee, the election of that committee or of that committee chairman shall take place by secret ballot. The newly elected committees and their chairmen shall take office on July 1 following their election."

For a comprehensive view of the functions of the University Senate, please refer to the following webpage: http://senate.uconn.edu/

The University Senate by-laws can be read here: http://policy.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/243/2017/05/bylaws.20170501.final_.pdf
The University by-laws regarding this matter can be found at http://policy.uconn.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/243/2017/04/20170329-By-Law-Revisions-final.pdf, page 16


Does the institution have written policies and procedures to identify and engage external stakeholders (i.e. local residents) in land use planning, capital investment projects, and other institutional decisions that affect the community?:
Yes

A copy of the written policies and procedures:
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The policies and procedures:

Public Hearings and public comment periods are required for land use planning, capital investment projects, and other institutional decisions that affect the community. These consist of a presentation of the project, including any tests or research that supports the project, how it might affect surrounding areas, the construction period and process, and any other background information that will help the public understand the purpose of the project. This presentation is followed by public comments and questions regarding the project, and contact information is provided for further comments by mail or email up until a comment period end date.


Does the institution have formal participatory or shared governance bodies through which community members representing the interests of the following stakeholder groups can regularly participate in institutional governance?:
Yes or No
Local government and/or educational organizations Yes
Private sector organizations Yes
Civil society (e.g. NGOs, NPOs) Yes

A brief description of the bodies and mechanisms through which external stakeholders are engaged in institutional governance (including information about each stakeholder group selected above):

Local government is involved in institutional governance through the process of the governor appointing twelve members to the Board of Trustees, as well as representatives on the board holding government positions such as the Commissioners of Agriculture, Economic and Community Development, and Education. Additionally, a member of the Board of Trustees is from the private sector, representing Oak Hill Capital Management, LLC. Finally, the board also includes the Chief of Staff of the Mohegan Tribe of Uncasville, CT.

The Board contains 12 Committees:
• Academic Affairs
• Buildings, Grounds and Environment
• Committee on Compensation
• Construction Management Oversight Committee
• Executive Committee
• Financial Affairs
• Institutional Advancement
• Joint Audit and Compliance
• Student Life
• Special Committee for Investigation
• Special Committee for Opportunities and Strategic Initiatives
• UConn Health

The Board also has representation in the Alumni Association, Honors & Awards, and the UConn Foundation.
The Board members include many representatives from UConn as well as from the state government, private corporations, and the Mohegan Tribe:

Mr. Andy F. Bessette ’75
The Travelers Companies, Inc.
Mr. Mark L. Boxer ’87
Cigna Corporation
Mr. Kevin A. Braghirol (Student Trustee) ’14
Mr. Charles F. Bunnell
The Mohegan Tribe
Chief of Staff
External & Governmental Affairs
Ms. Shari G. Cantor ’81
Mr. Richard T. Carbray, Jr. ’75
Mr. Sanford Cloud, Jr.
Andrea Dennis-LaVigne, D.V.M. ’03
Bloomfield Animal Hospital
Marilda L. Gandara, Esq. ’78

Thomas E. Kruger, Esq.
Paul, Hastings LLP
Ms. Rebecca Lobo ’95
The Honorable Dannel P. Malloy (President)
Governor of Connecticut
Mr. Donny Marshall ’96
Mr. Lawrence D. McHugh (Chair)
Middlesex County Chamber of Commerce
Mr. Denis J. Nayden ’76, ’78
Oak Hill Capital Management, LLC

Mr. Steven K. Reviczky
Commissioner
Department of Agriculture

Thomas D. Ritter, Esq. ’75
Brown Rudnick Berlack Israels LLP
Ms. Christine C. Savino (Student Trustee)
Ms. Catherine H. Smith
Commissioner
Department of Economic & Community Development
Dr. Dianna R. Wentzell
Commissioner
Department of Education

More information can be found here: http://boardoftrustees.uconn.edu/

Mansfield, CT’s Town/University Relations Committee (Town/Gown) was established in 1992 with a mission to promote and sustain positive relations between the University of Connecticut and the larger Mansfield community. The committee is comprised of representatives from both the Town and the University, and is co-chaired by the Mayor and the Special Assistant to the University President. Members of the public are encouraged to attend the meetings, and the committee always provides an opportunity for public comment.

Committee members consist of:

Town Representatives
-Paul Shapiro, Mayor & Co-Chair
-Paul Aho, PZC Member
-Maria Capriola, Interim Town Manager
-Elizabeth Paterson, Citizen Representative
-Mark Sargent, Council Member
-Rebecca Shafer, Citizen Representative

Staff Representatives
-Linda Painter, Director of Planning and Development
-Janell Mullen, Assistant Planner
-Cynthia van Zelm, Executive Director, Mansfield Downtown Partnership

UCONN Representatives
-Michael Kirk, Deputy Chief of Staff & Co-Chair
-John Armstrong, Director of Off-Campus Student Services
-Jason Coite
-Michael Gilbert, Vice President for Student Affairs
-Vacancy, Director of Planning

Student Representatives:
-Haley Hinton, USG External Affairs Chair
-Colin Mortimer, USG External Affairs Vice Chair

UConn is also a member of NACUBO (National Association of College and University Business Officers), SCUP (Society of College and University Planners), and U21 (which promotes global engagement and collaboration among college and universities world-wide).

There are also oftentimes specific stakeholder (both private sector and NGO) groups for specific projects, such as the Hazwaste Main Accumulation Area project (including stakeholders from Mansfield Fire Department, Naubesatuck Watershed Council, UConn ResLife, Mansfield Sustainability Committee, UConn Fire Department, Willimantic River Alliance, Town of Mansfield Planning, Mansfield Zoning, UConn Police Department, Fuss and O’Neill, and more), and also for the construction of the Compost Facility (including stakeholders and supporters from various NPOs).

Mansfield’s Town Gown advisory board includes the Mansfield Sustainability Committee, both of which meet monthly (Director of the OEP, Rich Miller, is a member; Sustainability Coordinator at the OEP, Sarah Munro, is a delegate). UConn’s student group, EcoHusky, partners with local land trust called Joshua’s Trust annually to help clean and maintain trails.

Local government is involved in institutional governance through the process of the governor appointing twelve members to the Board of Trustees, as well as representatives on the board holding government positions such as the Commissioners of Agriculture, Economic and Community Development, and Education. Additionally, a member of the Board of Trustees is from the private sector, representing Oak Hill Capital Management, LLC. Finally, the board also includes the Chief of Staff of the Mohegan Tribe of Uncasville, CT.


The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
Additional documentation to support the submission:
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The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.