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  • AASHE-STARS

The Sustainability Tracking, Assessment & Rating System™ (STARS) is a transparent, self-reporting framework for colleges and universities to measure their sustainability performance.

Overall Rating Silver
Overall Score 54.45
Liaison Claudia Kent
Submission Date June 30, 2017
Executive Letter Download

STARS v2.1

Haverford College
OP-21: Hazardous Waste Management

Status Score Responsible Party
Complete 0.50 / 1.00 Claudia Kent
Sustainability Coordinator/Organic Garden Advisor
Facilities Management
"---" indicates that no data was submitted for this field

Does the institution have strategies in place to safely dispose of all hazardous, special (e.g. coal ash), universal, and non-regulated chemical waste and seek to minimize the presence of these materials on campus?:
Yes

A brief description of steps taken to reduce hazardous, special (e.g. coal ash), universal, and non-regulated chemical waste:

We do have a hazardous waste policy that describes how to label and dispose of chemicals. It doesn't address minimizing. Also, there is chemical inventory system used by the sciences to track chemical locations allowing people to share chemicals and reduce ordering unnecessary volumes.


A brief description of how the institution safely disposes of hazardous, universal, and non-regulated chemical waste:

All hazardous and non-regulated chemical waste is collected and stored in a waste storage room located in the Koshland Integrated Science Center room E – 011A. In accordance with EPA regulations regarding our generator status as a “Small Quantity Generator” all hazardous and non-regulated chemical waste is removed by a licensed hazardous waste disposal company at no more than 180 day intervals. Haverford College currently contracts with Clean Ventures, Camden, New Jersey or Disposal Consultant Services, Piscataway, New Jersey. The waste material is treated or disposed of by various methods. These methods include the following: fuel blending, neutralization, recycling and purification for re-use. Disposal by landfill is considered by Haverford College to be a last resort method of disposal.

Universal wastes including batteries and mercury are removed from campus by Clean Ventures, Camden, New Jersey or Disposal Consultant Services, Piscataway, New Jersey. Haverford College recycles all types of batteries used on campus. In addition, a program has been implemented to accept personal batteries from students, staff, and faculty. Mercury is a very minimal waste stream on campus and is recycled or purified for reuse by the contractors mentioned above.

All waste fluorescent tubes are collected by the Facilities Department and recycled/disposed of by Veolia Environmental Services, Port Washington, Wisconsin.

Electronic wastes (other than computing equipment) is now collected for recycling by our hazardous waste contractor. This includes outdated laboratory electronics, televisions, phones and various other electronic waste.


A brief description of any significant hazardous material release incidents during the previous three years, including volume, impact and response/remediation:

None


A brief description of any inventory system employed by the institution to facilitate the reuse or redistribution of laboratory chemicals:

There is a chemical inventory system in the Koshland Integrated Science Center that tracks the chemicals used by the Departments of Biology and Chemistry. The inventory system is generally used to maintain an chemical inventory to comply with the EPA’s requirement of having an accurate and current inventory of all chemicals. The inventory system is used share chemicals within the Department of Chemistry or Biology to prevent excess inventories of similar or specialty chemicals. Occasionally, chemicals will be shared between Departments. There is no written policy that addresses this practice.


Does the institution have or participate in a program to responsibly recycle, reuse, and/or refurbish electronic waste generated by the institution?:
Yes

Does the institution have or participate in a program to responsibly recycle, reuse, and/or refurbish electronic waste generated by students?:
Yes

A brief description of the electronic waste recycling program(s), including information about how electronic waste generated by the institution and/or students is recycled:

As old electronic equipment comes into the Instructional and Information Technology Services (IITS), it is inventoried and stored in a secured room. Periodically the electronics recycling company buys the equipment. If there is any residual value, equipment may be refurbished and resold once any data storage devices are destroyed. As part of the agreement, data drives are destroyed by grinding into dust, with the metal components sorted by metal type and recycled.


Is the institution’s electronic waste recycler certified under the e-Stewards and/or Responsible Recycling (R2) standards?:
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Electronic waste recycled or otherwise diverted from the landfill or incinerator during the most recent year for which data is available during the previous three years:
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The website URL where information about the programs or initiatives is available:
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Additional documentation to support the submission:
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Contributing:
Mark Sweeney, Safety Coordinator/Associate Director: Safety and Security.

The information presented here is self-reported. While AASHE staff review portions of all STARS reports and institutions are welcome to seek additional forms of review, the data in STARS reports are not verified by AASHE. If you believe any of this information is erroneous or inconsistent with credit criteria, please review the process for inquiring about the information reported by an institution and complete the Data Inquiry Form.